The Polo is a vehicle that has been talked and wished for by American automotive journalist since the redesigned model started making the rounds in 2009. It is one of those cars that works well in a compact form like the 2011 Ford Fiesta or 2010 Nissan Versa. By no coincidence the Polo and the other cars mentioned were designed originally for the European markets (with the slight exception being the Versa). These cars also do very well in their market segments due to innovative designs that make the cars feel larger on the inside while still taking up a relatively small footprint on the outside. The Volkswagen Polo Sedan thought might be new to you and for the reason keep reading below.

2011 Volkswagen Polo Sedan unveiled in Russia

2011 Volkswagen Polo Sedan unveiled in Russia

2011 Volkswagen Polo GTI

2011 Volkswagen Polo GTI

The VW Polo Sedan is a car that was primarily designed for the Russian market, which is why news started hitting the wire last week about its launch. Now that VW has launched the sedan in Russia, the questions have already been asked—when will we see it come to the U.S.? No one knows for sure yet, but the Russian Polo version has some modifications that we think east coasters would fine useful, especially in Pennsylvania where potholes seem to be plentiful. According to VW the Polo sedan was specifically outfitted for Russian driving conditions. Upgrades include a new suspension design that is better equipped to withstand crumbling roads and tougher anti-rust paint coatings to withstand the weather climate. That combined with an equivalent price of 10,000 Euros makes the Polo Sedan a little over 2000 Euros cheaper in Russia than the hatchback in Germany.

Bottom line—the VW Polo Sedan would compete well with the Versa, Elantra, Forte, Fiesta and Cruze vehicles that are already or soon to be on sale here in the states. The question is: Does VW think they can sell enough to make it a viable import? I guess we will have to wait and see.