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Plug-in Electric Car Sales in Canada, March 2013


2011 Nissan Leaf and 2011 Chevy Volt, with charging station visible; photo by George Parrott

2011 Nissan Leaf and 2011 Chevy Volt, with charging station visible; photo by George Parrott

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If last month's U.S. plug-in electric car sales figures could be characterized as "March Madness" -- Leaf sales tripled, Tesla took the Q1 sales crown, but the Mitsubishi i-MiEV was down 90 percent -- the Canadian market was one of "March Modestness". 

Sales were up, and there were a few surprises, but the electric vehicle market remains low-key.

Co-champions

Both the Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt sold 82 units in Canada in March, sharing the title of the country's best-selling plug-in car for the month.

While this represents the Volt's 13th straight month at (or sharing) pole position, and sales rose healthily from February (51), the two-time Consumer Reports highest-owner-satisfaction survey winner suffered its first month of lower year-over-year sales (March 2012: 116).

The Volt's slowing momentum isn't limited to Canada, either, as March also marked the first month of lower year-over-year sales in the United States (1478 vs. 2289). That said, March 2012 had been a particularly good month for the Volt in both countries, coming on the heels of unusually low Jan/Feb 2012 sales. 

Chevrolet Volt Versus Nissan Leaf

Chevrolet Volt Versus Nissan Leaf

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NHTSA investigation and political circus, anyone?  Or maybe California inventory was low? It should also be noted that Chevrolet could also boost sales through dealer incentives or favorable financing, if it so chose.

Dealer incentives may well explain the Nissan Leaf's best-ever monthly sales total north of the 49th parallel, as Nissan Canada continues clearing out 2012 Leaf inventory prior to the 2013 model year's arrival later this spring.

The 82 units more than doubles February's 37 sales, and quadruples the year-over-year numbers (March 2012: 20).  The Leaf's prior monthly sales record had been set in December 2011 (59).

Given the likely contribution of incentives in March, one might expect Leaf demand to moderate in the coming months, ceding the top spot again to the Volt.  (Mind you, someone didn't expect anyone to seriously challenge the Volt's Canadian sales title this month, either!)

Runners-up

The Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid continued its slow, steady (and slim) sales pace in Canada, moving 28 units in March, slightly ahead of February (25). 

Although the 2013 models have arrived, as of early April, Toyota Canada's website still featured non-discounted pricing for the 2012 vehicle.  While dealership incentives are probably in place, this signals that the Prius Plug-in is a low priority in the country Volvo has taken to calling "Candanavia".

Toyota's apparent ambivalence towards the Canadian electric vehicle market is probably best illustrated by the fact that in the seven months since its introduction, 149 Prius Plug-in Hybrids have been sold in the country -- Chevy sold 143 Volts in its first month of availability, alone.  [Full disclosure: one of those Prius Plug-ins is the author's.]


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Comments (7)
  1. Surprising. With the extreme temperature, I would think PHEV/EREV would sell better than BEVs there...
     
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  2. To be clear, we're talking about extreme COLD, and that's probably pretty discouraging for all EVs. Extreme cold diminishes effective EV range (and so potential savings) for EREVs as well as shrinking total range on BEVs to inconvenient levels. That's a very practical concern, and one I think can only be addressed effectively with fuel-based car heaters. Why those aren't standard issue in Canada is beyond me.
     
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  3. I agree. I think a "flex fuel" based heater is even better.

    But I think it has more to do with "reputation" of being gas free instead of being "practical".
     
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  4. canadians don't like spending money, that premium on
    gas free range, they'd rather take the bus or walk then drive anyways
     
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  5. Far better than that, any battery heater not fuelled by electricity only needs to burn, since there is no special requirements for the fuel like there are in an ICE. You could use vodka if you *really* wanted to. ;)
     
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  6. You'd think that the same concern would be true of Norway and Sweden, but they're buying *far* more Leafs than Canada is.

    Or maybe the climate is much warmer, in spite of the latitude.
     
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  7. FYI, last month ZENN issued a press release that it is planning to release the CityZENN, a car that goes up to 125km/hr and sounds comparable to the Tesla Roadster in range (Tesla's a high-end electric sports car that just started production in the USA). So the issue of the existing low-speed-vehicle ZENN being too slow and not having the same safety requirements of a regular car will soon be a moot point. Also, they are going with a 5-minute-recharging supercapacitor system that is apparently much better than batteries. Baz - http://www.mymotortradeinsurance.co.uk
     
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