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One DC Quick-Charge Station For Every Four Electric Cars! But, Where?

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Map of electric-car DC quick-charging station locations in Estonia, Feb 2013

Map of electric-car DC quick-charging station locations in Estonia, Feb 2013

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Imagine a paradise for electric-car drivers, where half the car's cost is subsidized and there's a nationwide network of DC quick-charging stations so plentiful that there's one for every four cars.

Such a place exists, actually. It's called Estonia.

The tiny country of 1.2 million people, nestled on the Gulf of Finland between Latvia and Russia, has just opened a network of 165 CHAdeMO quick-charging stations--more than the U.S. has today--for its plug-in electric cars.

Which number, at the moment, exactly 619--500 of which are used by government agencies, along with 100-plus that are privately operated.

That doesn't sound like very many, but the country's rate of one electric car out of every 1,000 vehicles in the country is second only to Norway's.

In that country, despite the harsh winter weather, there are four electric cars per 1,000 vehicles--the result of a concerted program of incentives and benefits.

The cost of fast-charging an electric car in Estonia is between 2.5 and 5 euros ($3.40 and $6.80), and drivers can pay either with an authorization card or by using their mobile phones.

There's also an "all you can eat" program that allows unlimited fast-charging for 30 euros (roughly $40).

Fast Charging 2011 Nissan Leaf

Fast Charging 2011 Nissan Leaf

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The maximum distance between fast charging stations is 60 km (36 miles), which permits even those electric cars with lower ranges to travel longer distances without worrying about not making it to the next charging station.

DC fast-charging recharges an electric car's depleted battery pack to 80 percent of capacity in half an hour or less, compared to the several hours it would take using a 240-Volt Level 2 charging station.

The fast chargers were funded by Estonia's sale of excess CO2-emission permits to Mitsubishi, whose i-MiEV electric minicars make up most of the nation's electric car fleet (along with the relabeled Peugeot iOn and Citroen C-Zero models of the same vehicle).

The deal included not only the cars and the chargers but the subsidies for electric-car purchase.

Other electric cars now on sale in Estonia including the Nissan Leaf and the Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid.

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Comments (6)
  1. The Estonians sure understand the chicken and the egg problem for EV's and seem to have fixed one side of that equation. Or put another way, build it and they will come.

    Be interesting to see if people start to buy EV's in Estonia or not.
     
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  2. Estonia has gotten the key points right when building an Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Network.

    1. Standerized on Quick Chargers (DC) that deliver higher kW/h (MPH of charge). This enables greater number of EVs to charge during hours of peak demand.

    2. Authorization by using mobile phones, in addition to network card. Avoids issues of not having working card (defective, or misplaced).

    3. All charge locations are in common map database. Makes checking on a charging station status & trip planning seamless. Experience of rerouting should a charger go offline is better; a driver doesn't have to use multiple Apps, or websites to find an alternative charger location. Customer billing is likely simplified as well.

    4. Great initial coverage.
     
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  3. trip planning?? who needs to trip plan when the farthest distance is 36 miles but most are much closer together?

    Will Estonians come? I cant see how they would not. unlimited QC for $40 a month? (less than the cost of a single tank of gas i bet) and a car for MUCH less than any other option?

    oh ya, they will come and betting that 500 vehicle government fleet will be expanding very soon as well.

    it would only take a few years of gas savings to pay for the entire network
     
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  4. That is very impressive - a lesson for everywhere else!
     
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  5. Estonia also Has A Free Public Transport System As Well
    Wish All Country's Where So Progressive
     
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  6. Ah but Americans don't like subsidised anything do they? smacks of socialism.
     
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