Advertisement

May Plug-In Electric Car Sales: Nissan Leaf Passes Chevy Volt

 
Follow John

2013 Nissan Leaf, Nashville area test drive, April 2013

2013 Nissan Leaf, Nashville area test drive, April 2013

Enlarge Photo

Plug-in car sales continued at a steady pace in May, with early estimates of perhaps 6,500 to 7,000 sold overall.

As always, precise figures are impossible because Tesla Motors [NSDQ:TSLA] does not report monthly sales as every other carmaker does.

We'll refine our totals as more reports come in over the course of the day (and, for the Ford plug-in numbers, tomorrow).

Second-best month for Leaf

Fulfilling expectations of consistently higher deliveries, the May sales for the 2013 Nissan Leaf electric car came in at 2,138.

That's the Leaf's second-best sales month ever, trailing only March, when 2,236 were sold after supplies of U.S.-built plug-in electric cars finally started to reach Nissan dealers.

With five months gone, Leaf sales total 7,614, almost triple the 2,613 Leafs sold at this time last year. 

If Nissan can keep up the pace at the average of the last three months, it might deliver 22,500 or more Leafs for the year.

"With more than 27,000 Leafs on the road in the U.S., we are moving beyond the early adopters," said Erik Gottfried, Nissan director for electric vehicle sales and marketing, "as people get more educated about how an electric car can meet their daily driving needs."

The Leaf has traditionally sold well on the West Coast, Gottfried added, but "now we’re seeing places like Atlanta, Chicago and Denver become hot markets as well."

It's still worth noting, however, that the Leaf represented only 2 percent of Nissan's total of 106,558 sales in May.

Volt only holding steady

The Chevrolet Volt, the best-selling plug-in electric car last year, logged 1,607 deliveries--bringing its yearly total to 7,157.

That's just 100 cars more than last year's comparable total of 7,057, which doesn't exactly indicate sales growth for the Volt.

That total, moreover, puts it behind the Leaf in total sales for the year. The Volt and Leaf were neck and neck last month.

Total Volt sales last year were 23,461, more than twice the Leaf's total of 9,819.

GM's plug-in sales totals will see an addition at the end of the year, however, as the 2014 Cadillac ELR arrives at dealerships. The first pre-production ELRs have already been assembled.

Tesla: the big unknown

First-quarter sales of the Tesla Model S electric luxury sport sedan were reported by the company at roughly 4,900.

That made the Model S the best-selling plug-in car in the U.S. for that period. Unfortunately, we'll have to wait until sometime in July or August to know how many Model Ses it sold for the April-June period.

If U.S. monthly sales were to average as many as 1,800 cars--which would take Tesla to its announced goal of 21,000 units for the year--the Model S would likely be the third best-selling plug-in car in the country.

Tesla owners & supporters gather in Statehouse in Austin to support company [photo: John Griswell]

Tesla owners & supporters gather in Statehouse in Austin to support company [photo: John Griswell]

Enlarge Photo

However, some portion of those 21,000 Model S deliveries will come from Europe, where sales are starting this summer, and perhaps from Asia late in the year as well.

That means Tesla's monthly sales to U.S. buyers could drop considerably as it works through its list of buyers who've put down deposits, but the company could still meet its first full-year goal.

Whether the company will provide data on its sales by country remains unknown. Autodata estimates Tesla's May sales at 1,425 units.

Plug-in hybrids strong

Toyota's sales of its Prius Plug-In Hybrid have been trailing off. It delivered 678 of them last month, bringing the five-month total to 3,630.

That's more than the previous month's 599, but less than the number sold in January, February, or March.

Ford's sales of its two Energi plug-in hybrid models surged in May, meanwhile. The company said last week that it had sold more hybrids (regular and plug-in) through May than it did during all of 2012.

The Ford Fusion Energi found 416 buyers, and 450 of its stablemate, the Ford C-Max Energi, were delivered.

Together, that means Ford has delivered more than 3,200 plug-in hybrids for the first five months of the year. That's nearing the number of Prius plug-ins sold.

Honda delivered 58 of its 2014 Accord Plug-In Hybrids in its slow and cautious rollout of that car, bringing the year's total thus far to 158 altogether.

Compliance cars

With a price reduction to $259 monthly for a Honda Fit EV lease, Honda is one of several carmakers are showing that they intend to sell the legally required minimum number of "compliance cars" to meet the California zero-emission vehicle requirements.

The Toyota RAV4 EV, with its 103-mile EPA-rated range, remains a compliance car but one of a slightly different stripe.

And the Ford Focus Electric is now available in all 50 states, though it sells only at levels that put it into the compliance car bucket as well.

In May, 157 Focus Electrics found buyers, just 10 more than the previous month--and giving a five-month total of just 623.




Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (72)
  1. I think this is great news. In just the past 6 months I've seen way more EVs on the road than ever before. I do events with my EV and usually it was me or one other EV that joined and now we get 4 to 6. Still too soon to be certain the momentum will continue at this pace, but hopeful
     
    Post Reply
    +4
    Bad stuff?

  2. I was one of those monthly sales quantities of the 2013 Leaf - but it was replacing my 2011 Leaf. My 2011 Leaf was dropping range (battery capacity) at a rate I felt was not acceptable. 2nd capacity status bar gone after just 2 full years and nearly 30K miles. So although the monthly sales are correct, I wonder if/how the actual owner and operator numbers are being tracked? I'm sure I am not alone in transitioning yet. (Full disclosure - I live in Dallas and understand the role excessive heat plays on battery deterioration.)
     
    Post Reply
    +5
    Bad stuff?

     
  3. Hi just curius. Do you max charge most or all of the time?
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  4. And a follow up:)
    How about fastcharging on hot days?
    If so, to 80 or 100% ?
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  5. On the 2011 I did max charge most of the time - using a 110 trickle at the office and my 220 charger at home. I only did DC fast charging about 5 times in the 2 years I owned it. I really think the hot blacktop I park in at the office was as much, if not more to blame than anything. It can get to well over 130 degrees during the summer and I think it cooked the batteries.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  6. Chris, no concern that the same thing could happen to the 2013 model? I'm interested in knowing your thoughts if you feel like sharing them. Thanks in advance.

    As a 2012 Leaf driver in surprisingly hot Washington DC (in the summer months), I'm concerned I might lose my first bar later this year when temps get around 100 degrees again.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  7. Although I am concerned a little on the 2013 model, I am going to lessen the amount of full charges and try and park in a "cooler" part of our parking lot at the office. I was provided with my own parking space and an outlet for my trickle charging, but it's on black asphalt that really cooks the underneath of my Leaf. But this is partly why I leased the Leaf - to get through the initial challenges of the new technologies. My dealer was exceptional in the trade-in of my 2011 for the 2013.
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  8. hay Chris. I too live in the metro D.C. area.I have a 2011 Leaf and lost my first capacity bar/dot after 2 year, 3675 miles.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  9. Wow, only 3675 miles? That doesn't seem like enough to justify an EV car and the extra expense (unless you are leasing).

    It was one of the reasons I decided against buying one. It's a catch 22. You have to drive a lot of miles to justify it, but you can't drive a lot of miles when you have about a 75 mile range on a full change.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  10. yes we are a low mileage household. The car was a dealer demo purchased after 1 year with only 300 odd miles on it. We only get 30 to 40 miles on a charge so It's hard to put miles on when you can't take long trips. Bicycling to work everyday does not help.
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  11. How many miles you put on a car mostly depends on your commute I'd think...
    http://www.plugincars.com/after-2-years-78000-miles-high-mileage-2011-nissan-leaf-127387.html
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  12. @Mike,

    1 bar after only 3,675 miles? That is shocking. I guess there is some natural "aging" vs. time. Temperature and mileage aren't the only ones.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  13. Question? If you had range degradation on your first Leaf, why did you get another one? Did they correct the problem on the newer models? I own a Volt and absolutely love it. No degradation here. In fact Volts that are over 2 years old and 60,000 miles still do not show any degradation, not even one mile less. Just wondering. Either way, good luck and enjoy the new car.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  14. Thanks Joseph and obviously a good question. Part of the reason was a loyalty factor and the fact the local Nissan dealer has taken such good care of me. (Both the salesman and GM are Leaf drivers so they have "empathy" for my situation). I also like the 100% electric factor - not once have I been "stuck" with no power (knock on wood). But I have limitations for travel and must take that into consideration on a regular basis. In 3 years time, I'll re-evaluate my needs and the automotive products available then. (I so want to drive the new Cadillac based on the Volt platform!!!)
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  15. Joseph. How does one check baby terry degradation on the volt? Thx in advance.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  16. James, The most accurate way is to look at how many Kwh used showing on the screen after using up all the battery power. Make sure that does not start ticking down. Max range in the summer and winter will also give you an idea if your driving stays the same.
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  17. It is hard to do so. B/c Volt's computer naturally protect you from using 100% of the capacity. So, even if it does degrade, you won't see the difference.
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  18. No degradation in a Volt is sweet, I'm thinking the Volt uses a thermal management system to protect the battery from heat and cold the Leaf does not.. Also don't quote me, the Volt batteries do degrade but they don't use the entire battery like the Leaf does so when the battery capacity drops you never notice it because there is excess capacity. or I could be wrong.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  19. There are more comments in this thread
    There are more comments in this thread
  20. I'm generally surprised at how well the BEVs are doing in relation to the PHEV's. With the Leaf, Tesla Model S currently going strong and the Fiat 500e, Chevy Spark and SmartEV coming on line now the BEV segment looks much stronger than I expected a year ago.

    My thoughts then were that PHEV's would make up 75% of the market but it looks like BEV's will be 50%+.

    The BMW i3 slotting in the premium market but at roughly half the price of of a Tesla Model S is very well positioned to sell a ton of cars. If they hit the 90-95 epa on the range and have a high 6 second-low 7 second 0-60 time the car well sell like crazy.

    BMW has been very quiet lately and the specs/options have not moved for over a year. I think a surprise could happen.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  21. To be fair, $42000 is not half the price of a Model S. You can walk away with a 60 kWh unit for under $70k before incentives.

    Tesla is having a very good year and if they deliver the Model X on schedule, I suspect they'll keep rolling along just fine.
    Their sales target this year is 21000 but they only need to deliver 16000 cars to break $1 billion on sales - more than 5x their total revenue in 2011.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  22. Looks like GMs CEO (Akerson) did a disservice to the Volt by declaring that the next one will be $10K cheaper.

    Sales 101... do NOT disclose upcoming price drops.
     
    Post Reply
    +5
    Bad stuff?

     
  23. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborne_effect
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  24. I think a tipping point has been reached, or will be soon.

    The market is finally beginning to understand where EVs fit in the pantheon, and they make sense as a second or even third car.

    Clearly still a car for the well heeled but there are enough of them to make a difference. go back 25 years and think about the cell phone. Not a mass market by any means but big enough to make difference. I had a Nokia handheld and it cost me 1500 quid, and 33p a minute in central London. But there were enough of us to fund the next gen of phones. You know how that story panned out.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  25. Nissan dropped the Leaf's price. Didn't that have a positive effect on sales?
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  26. I believe that is the biggest factor. In fact, all the new 2013 Leaf at my workplace are all the base S trim.

    And they ALL LEASED their Leaf.
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  27. I too have suddenly noticed an increase in Nissan Leafs, I saw one out on the highway the other day doing a little over 70 MPH. For a while I had mostly been seeing Volts but all of a sudden I'm seeing one or more Leafs every time I go out.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  28. @Voelker,

    A good information would be if you can find out how many buyers are leasing the Leaf vs. Buying. It would be a good piece of information since many buyers are making the comments that at $199/month, the saving in gas alone is paying for the car. So, in effect they are driving it for free.

    I wonder how much longer Nissan can keep it up with the low price Leaseing price plan.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  29. Isn't this a California thing? I think I read a Green Car Reports article that listed the Leaf, Focus EV, Spark EV and the Fiat 500e all at $999 down and $199/month.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  30. Well, sort of ever since Leaf started the low leasing price.

    If it is 3 yr leasing deal, CA also chips in $2,500 for the buyer.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  31. Rather than thinking of the Leaf and Volt as big fish in the small electric vehicle pond, they should be small fish in the big vehicle market in general. That way, they'll have plenty of room to grow.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  32. Well, don't you know that it is already BEV vs. PHEV war in some part of the EV world?
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

  33. I really hope Ford will up production of the Focus EV. I'd love to get a sweet deal (and big rebate) in October when we go shopping.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  34. Why do you compare the Leaf and the Volt? They are two different vehicles. The Leaf has a limited range with a tow truck extender. The Volt will run 350 mile+ and fuel up and go 320 more. Leaf = lower priced, short range , limited economy transportation. Volt = Sport Car handling, luxury appointments, unlimited range. 240 mile trip gets 60 mpg beating Prius.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  35. But Leaf is cheaper and some EV fan considers it as an EV "flagship" product.

    Volt, on the other hand, has been "hated" by the pure BEV fans...
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  36. I have relatives that "hate" the Volt because it is made by Chevy. Name brands can "sell" a car, or not sell one.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  37. Your relatives aren't alone. They are plenty of Leaf owners, Telsa owners and various BEV owners who "hate" the Volt b/c it still has an engine in it (even though they don't hate Prius) and/or b/c GM makes it due to the EV-1 history and/or b/c GM called it EREV.

    I think oil companies are laughing their arse off b/c all the stupid "in-fighting" inside the EV community.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  38. @ Li: I think you hit the nail on its head. I am reluctant to replace my Leaf at the end of the lease with a Volt because I don't trust GM and what they did to the EV1 people. I will probably go with a Ford C-Max Energi. I believe that is a PHEV.
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  39. @Ralph,

    That is fine. But your reasoning is silly. The product speaks for itself. I don't believe in "corporate loyalty"....
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  40. But not by the people that own one.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  41. Instead of bogus and unsubstantiated preconceptions, what about some verifiable numbers?

    Based on EPA ratings, for a 240-mile trip, starting fully charged:
    Volt would need 5.46 gallons of premium gas (44 MPG overall), ~$22.
    Prius: 4.8 gallons, regular (50 MPG), $17.50.
    Plus-in Prius: 4.58 gallons (52 MPG), $17.
    Leaf: some quick-charging, e.g. $3.50:
    http://www.plugincars.com/my-280-mile-single-day-nissan-leaf-roadtrip-127060.html

    No wonder the Leaf is selling well...
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

     
  42. "what about some verifiable numbers"

    Sure, let us start with yours:
    240 miles trip, Volt is rated 38 miles range and 40 mpg ( hwy) So, Volt would need 5.05 gallon of premium gas. Even @ 2012 model where it is 35 miles EV range, it would require 5.125 gallon.

    Prius is rated 48mpg hwy. So that is 5 gallons.
    Pip is rated 49mpg Hwy and you get ZERO EV miles if you drive faster than 62.1MPH. But let us say you get that 11 miles, then it is 4.67 gallon of gas.

    Leaf. Can't make the trip unless the trip is specifically design to have DC quick charger on the way.

    I used the hwy figure b/c that is more applicable since we are talking about continues 240 miles trip
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

     
  43. BTW this still puzzles me that Prius is rated 48mpg hwy and Prius Plugin is rated 49mpg hwy when the Prius plugin is 150lbs heavier and the EV powertrain shouldn't contribute anything signficantly in a long distanc cruising once the battery is exhausted...

    So much for EPA rating...
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  44. I used the EPA combined city/highway mileage, which are:

    Volt: 37 MPG
    Prius, incl plug-in: 50 MPG

    Also, your assumption that the PiP doesn't benefit from its battery when its ICE engages is obviously mistaken.

    Regardless, as you just confirmed, even with the rating most favorable to the Volt, Richard's claim that it has better gas mileage than the Prius on such trip still isn't true, and my point remains valid.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  45. "your assumption that the PiP doesn't benefit from its battery when its ICE engages is obviously mistaken."

    It doesn't if it is greater than 62.1mph and set to cruise at a constant speed and load. On the downhill part, it benefits...

    Also, the trade off is somehow 150lbs.

    But yet they manage to have even higher MPG in a 240 miles trip. So, obviously the EPA rating is "lying" here. We all know that EPA test loop is less than 11 miles which is EXACTLY where the benefit comes in...
    0
    Bad stuff?

  46. Also, he said Prius, not Prius plugin.

    If the Volt is allowed to sit there for 3 hours like the Leaf during this 240 miles trip, then it will DEFINETLY use less gas than the regular Prius. Additional 3 hrs charging will give the Volt another 27-28 EV miles. That will bring the Volt gas consumption rate to be lower than the Prius.

    Not to mention that out of this group, the Volt is BY FAR the best performing car. EVEN CONSUMER REPORT AGREED ON THAT.
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  47. Just to point out the error. The PIP goes into Blended Mode at speeds above 62mph. It will use the ICE and the extra EV power to more than double fuel economy (80mpg-120mpg displayed)until the EV range is exhausted. I would normally be at 35mpg-60mpg during this time in HV Mode. I find that using EV Mode at 60mph only gets me about 9miles or so despite my estimated range of 12 miles EV. In blended mode I would go about 14 miles with 12 miles estimated EV range.

    I tested the idea this morning during my 49 mile uphill (25ft ASL to 1,200ft ASL) commute. With a single charge I get 60mpg. Without I get 48mpg. This is at 65mpg with CC set.
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  48. Also, if you are willing to include the Leaf for 240 miles for the charging, then why don't you allow the PIP or Volt to fill up somewhat?


    Now, let us talk about that PLUGIN cars article. There were plenty of comments on that blog. Someone else pointed the FACT that this guy took an EXTRA LONG detour route b/c the location of the DC quick charger and it took him about 1.5 hr EXTRA each way to do that trip. That is 3 hours additional time.

    So, the Volt and Prius would have driven 240 miles in 4 hours where the Leaf require 7 hours.

    Also, I am still waiting for any Leaf drivers to make it from SF Bay Area to Lake Tahoe and back in 1 day. (Easily done with any other ICE/Hybrid/PHEV/EREV and Tesla S).
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  49. "No wonder the Leaf is selling well... "

    Correction: No wonder the Leaf is "leasing" well. Everyone is afraid to "buy" one.

    http://www.hybridcars.com/kbb-used-nissan-leaf-prices-to-decline-by-5-percent/
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  50. I don't see why people would be more afraid of buying an EV versus, say, an inherently more complex hybrid.

    Anyway, the article you link unfortunately doesn't discuss renting vs leasing ratio at all, something I'm actually curious about too.

    Do you have such numbers?
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  51. (oops, meant: _buying_ vs leasing ratio...)
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  52. Getting a leaf only "works out" in dollar terms if you lease. The car can be leased for $200 a month but buying a $30,000 car with a 5 year loan would cost you $500+ a month. The savings on gasoline almost makes the lease payment for a lot of drivers
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  53. Actually, I think it is because leasing is such a good deal. The manufacturer gets the full $7500 from the government so they can factor that in the lease price. Us common folk can't get anywhere near the $7500. I don't pay that much in total in a year.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  54. There are more comments in this thread
  55. I looked at the Volt a couple of times and considered leasing one last year but decided against it. I do not consider it to have sports car handling nor luxurious appointments. The only way you can get 60 mpg on a 240 mile trip is by starting with a fully charged battery. So that has to be factored into the cost per mile. 4 gallons of gas plus whatever it costs to fully charge the battery.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  56. @Kit: Using average U.S. electric price of 12 cents/kWh, and assuming a full recharge of the 10.5 kWh that are usable within the 16-kWh pack, a full recharge costs roughly $1.25.

    So you're looking at $16 of gasoline (at $4/gal) + $1.25 for electricity. Check your electric bill for your own actual per-kWh rate.

    Hope this helps.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  57. @John OK, lets get REAL. My TXU Rate 10pm - 6am is zero per KWh. My premium fuel cost me $3.69 per gallon.
    Dallas-Tyler 120 miles.
    120 minus 50 electric miles = 70 gas miles
    70 gas miles using 1.8 gallons = 38.9 mpg
    Total fuel cost was $6.64
    Combined mpg is 120 / 1.8 = 66.7 mpg
    Real numbers from a real owner.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  58. @Richard: First, I'm not understanding what you're saying. You don't pay for your electricity? You charge at a plug owned by someone else who pays for the electricity?

    Second, I was responding to Kit Kimes' post which said 4 gallons of gasoline. That's where that number came from.
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  59. @Richard:You pay nothing for your KwH? You must be using a public charging station. If you are using eVgo network you must have a monthly subscription. Blink network is not charging yet. Are you using a Blink Network station?
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  60. @ John & Ralph: My TXU Rate 10pm - 6am is zero per KWh. That is a real plus for Texans that have any electric car. The Tesla S and the Leaf as I understand them will not make the 240 mile trip without charging enroute.
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  61. Did you drive a Volt? It goes around corners absolutely flat ... no lean. It accelerates faster than my Olds Rocket V8 did and when my nephew hit 90 mph accelerating I told "You can back off now", I am very sure it will exceed 100 mph on battery. As to luxury the interior compares to my Lexus 430. Buy the best trim with the backup camera.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  62. It will, it feels like you've hit a wall at 101 when the governor kicks in and limits you to 101, pretty fun.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  63. Good to know Kacey. I have no desire to test that so I will take your word for it. When my nephew hit 90 it was not planned that way but it was still accelerating very nicely. I like a car that accelerates with all the rest of the traffic and never makes me feel like my performance is lacking. The VOLT has never left me lacking. Thanks
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  64. A Leaf is a EV, not a Plugin Hybrid Electric Vehicle and therefore should not be compared to a Chevy Volt. The Volt is "Range Anxiety Free". Range = unlimited.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  65. @Richard: Any car that plugs into the grid for part or all of its energy is still a rare item, very advanced, and pretty much unknown to the broad car-buying public. That's why we group all plug-ins together in this sales report.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  66. After digging around I found a true review by John Voelcker that is reasonably accurate and a good review.
    http://www.greencarreports.com/overview/chevrolet_volt_2013
    Any comparison with a Leaf is absurd. Leaf/Spark ... OK.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  67. Regarding range: on any vehicle it is only limited by the driver's ability and willingness to refuel.

    Like the Mitsubishi i, the Leaf can recharge in 20 to 30 minutes, effectively allowing trips of whatever length one deems practical.

    Granted, considerations such as weighting the inconvenience of longer refueling times against financial or environmental benefits will still likely result in acceptable distances in a quick-charge-capable EV lower than with an ICE or hybrid for most people. The key point is that the limit is now a personal decision, only influenced -- not imposed -- by the vehicle.
     
    Post Reply
    -1
    Bad stuff?

     
  68. "The key point is that the limit is now a personal decision, only influenced -- not imposed -- by the vehicle. "

    I would like to add "infrastructure" to that.

    The so called 280 miles can't be completely on most of the roads today. Even in CA, once you leave the major DC quick charge center, you are SOL. Like I said, the SF to Lake Tahoe, LA to LV route are clear examples.

    That Leaf blogger choose a route that perfectly fit for DC quick charging.

    Also, how much longer do you think all those so called "free" quick DC charger is going to be? I don't think it will last forever. That is why Nissan is trying to do something like Tesla by asking dealers to install them...
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  69. Xiaolong, you are right. There are NO DC fast chargers in the Metro D.C. area so a Leaf would have to jump from one public station to the next. A 240 mile trip would take all day-something most drivers around here will not do. We/I would just drive a gas gobbler.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement

Find Green Cars

Go!
Advertisement

Advertisement

 
© 2014 Green Car Reports. All Rights Reserved. Green Car Reports is published by High Gear Media. Send us feedback. Stock photography by Homestar, LLC.