1,000-mile Nissan Leaf electric-car road trip in the Northeast: are we there yet?

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When my son scored a coveted civil engineering summer internship in Silver Spring, Maryland, the chance for an electric-car road trip from our Boston-area home presented itself.

Sure, I could have done the sensible thing and taken my trusty 2006 Toyota Prius, but where would be the adventure in that?

Instead, I seized the chance to take my 84-mile 2015 Nissan Leaf, throwing myself at the mercy of the scant CHAdeMO fast-charging infrastructure between Boston and Silver Spring, a 1,000-mile round trip.

DON'T MISS: Electric-Car Road Trips: Be Prepared, With Charging Apps And Realism (Dec 2014)

In the process, I learned a lot about the current challenges of long-distance travel with a battery-electric vehicle—and how those will change as more affordable 200-mile electric cars start to become available over the next couple of years..

The trip required a lot of planning, due to the paucity of DC fast chargers along the Northeast corridor from Boston to Washington, D.C.

I made the tactical decision to prioritize sites with two CHAdeMO chargers, so that if one was broken or occupied, at least one other would likely still be available. While this made the route longer, it boosted my chances of success.

Fast-charging 2015 Nissan Leaf at evGo station in Auburn, MA [photo: John Briggs]

Fast-charging 2015 Nissan Leaf at evGo station in Auburn, MA [photo: John Briggs]

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Route from Boston to Silver Spring, Maryland [graphic: John Briggs]

Route from Boston to Silver Spring, Maryland [graphic: John Briggs]

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Map of CHAdeMO DC fast-charging sites for the Northeast, Jul 2016 [graphic: John Briggs]

Map of CHAdeMO DC fast-charging sites for the Northeast, Jul 2016 [graphic: John Briggs]

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The journey

Ultimately, I settled on nine charging locations. The median distance between my stops would be only 55 miles, with a low of 25 and a high of 74. The shortage of charging stations and some range anxiety on my part required some stops to come sooner than would have been optimal.

Distance: The most direct path listed by Google shows a direct distance of 432 miles, but routing to hit the preferred charging locations increased that to 502 miles.

Travel time: Google says that the nonstop trip should take 7 hours and 10 minutes. Rerouting increased the total travel time to 9 hours and 3 minutes. But the nine charging sessions added 5 more hours to the trip, for a total of 14 hours—almost double the estimate for a conventional gasoline car.

CHECK OUT: Cross-Country Electric-Car Trips: Reality For A Few, Getting Closer For Many (Oct 2014)

Cost: Seven of the nine charging stations were part of the Nissan-eVgo “No charge to charge” program, meaning they are free for me as a Leaf owner for my first two years. The other two stations were run by ChargePoint, and cost me about $4 per charge or $8 for the 500-mile trip.

The numbers: The median driving time was 1 hour and 22 minutes and the median charging time was 30 minutes which amounts to about 1 minute of charging for every 3 minutes of driving.

The average energy per charge was 11.1 kwh, and the total consumed on the trip down was 101.8 kwh (the energy of just 3 gallons of gasoline!). As calculated from the energy numbers on the charging stations, my car's efficiency was 0.199 kwh per mile, or 5.0 miles per kwh.

2015 Nissan Leaf at evGo fast charger at Arundel Mills Mall, Hanover, MD [photo John Briggs]

2015 Nissan Leaf at evGo fast charger at Arundel Mills Mall, Hanover, MD [photo John Briggs]

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Charger Issues

Fast charging is critical to any long-distance use of electric cars. But as I learned, today there remain several notable challenges.

Location apps: Charger locations can be found with apps and websites. The ChargePoint app shows all nine of the nine charging sites I used on the trip.

However, PlugShare only lists seven of those nine, and it showed exactly zero until I figured out that I needed to check the “Show Nissan No Charge to Charge Locations Only” (a bug, if you ask me). The NissanConnect EV program only showed six of the nine, and frequently listed only one charger where two actually exist.

ALSO SEE: Electric Motorcycle Road Trip: What I Learned, What You Need To Know (Jul 2014)

Charger spacing: There are two issues with locations. First, the trip would have been easier if chargers were located, say, every 80 miles. But if the next chargers are located at 100 miles and 50 miles, stopping at 80 miles is not possible.

Secondly, the chargers were often at shopping malls, which is nice if they happen to be near the highway. But it's less nice if it requires you to drive 16 minutes from the highway to charge, and then 16 minutes back.

Precise location: Shopping malls are massive places; it proved entirely possible to spend 10 minutes looking for a charger and still not find it. Apps sometimes have helpful hints for locations, although I found the ChargePoint app frequently showed the pinpoint in an entirely wrong location.


 
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