Advertisement

Would You Retrofit A Range Extender To Your Electric Car?

Follow Antony

Hyperdrive's retrofit range-extending engine for electric cars

Hyperdrive's retrofit range-extending engine for electric cars

Enlarge Photo

Companies that convert regular gasoline cars to electric, or add a plug-in option to regular hybrids, are nothing new.

The same can't be said for companies taking electric cars and turning them into range-extended electric vehicles with small gasoline engines--but that's exactly what Hyperdrive, from the North East of England, is developing.

The idea is sound, based on the reasons cars like the Chevrolet Volt exist in the first place: range anxiety.

Most electric cars are still limited by their range for many drivers. Cars like the Volt get around this by using a gasoline engine as a generator, providing power when the batteries run out.

Hyperdrive's system is effectively a way of turning existing electric cars into vehicles with the same benefits as the Volt.

Unfortunately, details on the unit itself are scarce. Neither Hyperdrive's press release nor its website provide many details on how the system is integrated, only that it's a 15 kW (20 horsepower) gasoline unit and compact in size.

The company's demonstration vehicle appears to be based on an electric conversion of the Daihatsu Sirion subcompact, a car not normally sold as an electric vehicle. The range-extending engine itself is designed to occupy some of the space normally filled by batteries--reducing the car's electric range, but offering more possibilities once the battery runs out.

It's mainly aimed at smaller applications--small cars, commercial vehicles, marine applications and even as a portable power pack for breakdown services. A similarly-powerful diesel range extender is also on the way, thanks to $420,000 in funding from a North East-based, UK government-backed development fund.

There's no word yet on when such a project will be available, nor how widely it can be used--but it's a novel idea, and one we look forward to hearing more from.

_______________________________________________________

Follow GreenCarReports on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Google+

Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (65)
  1. Antony, With due respect, the Chevy Volt's ICE does NOT act SIMPLY as a generator. When the ICE running, it is directing mechanical power to the wheels through the planetary gear trans. Therefore, the Chevy Volt is a hybrid (or partial EV, EV+, dual-mode, or whatever someone might want to call it).

    The BMW i3 REx, when it goes on sale, will be the only EV with an ICE that acts SOLELY as a generator, thus it is a true EV.

    I understand WHY GM calls the Volt an EV, but that does not change the fact that it's really a hybrid.

    Since this site is preaching to the choir, as it were, I think we are all adult enough here to take things for what they really are, even if some will undoubtedly continue to live with their heads in the sand.
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

     
  2. @Eric: You say, "The BMW i3 REx, when it goes on sale, will be the only EV with an ICE that acts SOLELY as a generator..."

    Ummmmmmm ... Fisker Karma ??
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

     
  3. The Fisker Karma is, just like the Volt, hybrid - the ICE is MECHANICALLY connected to the wheels through the transmission. If there is a MECHANICAL CONNECTION between the ICE and wheels, it is DEFINITIVELY a hybrid, whether there is a plug or not.
     
    Post Reply
    -3
    Bad stuff?

     
  4. The mechanical connection between the range extender and the wheels only engages at higher speeds, around 70 MPH, and then only when the battery is depleted.

    In battery mode - 100 miles per hour all electric - not many "hybrids" can do that.
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

     
  5. does it have a MECHANICAL LINKAGE between the ICE and the wheels? Yes. Therefore, HYBRID. It doesn't matter if it uses clutches or magic pixie dust, if there is a MECHANICAL linkage between the ICE and the wheels, then it is a hybrid. Period.
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  6. @Eric: If you want to be technical, any vehicle that runs on electricity and liquid fuel is a hybrid. So the BMW i3 REx is a hybrid as well.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_vehicle

    But if you ask Tesla, you may get a different answer:
    http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/evolving-landscape-evs
    "Many people have criticized GM for spinning the issue and calling the Volt an EV with a range extender, and not a hybrid. Those people are usually surprised when I tell them I agree with GM 100% on this. Although the technical terminology of series hybrid has been in existence for over 100 years, the marketplace has redefined “Hybrid” in such a way that I think it misrepresents the key differences between the platforms."
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  7. @Eric: Please explain to me exactly how the Fisker Karma's engine, in the front, mechanically drives any of its wheels.

    The only driven wheels are in the rear, and the only torque input into the axle shafts is the pair of electric motors, one in front, one behind the differential.

    I'm afraid the Fisker Karma doesn't actually HAVE a transmission. Please provide links and sources to prove otherwise.
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  8. @Eric Pruss,

    Please get yourself educated before you post again.

    Your wrong post just keep showing up with bad information over and over again

    1. Karma doesn't have any link. It is strictly series configuration.

    2. Volt has an electronically controlled clutch that engage and disengaged based on the vehicle speed to determine if it is series or parallel configuration.

    3. Volt in the EV mode doesn't have the ICE on at all. No other hybrid can operate as such except for the upcoming i3. Even the Karma will turn on the engine when sports mode is engaged....
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

     
  9. Re 3: outside the US at least, Priuses/Prii? have a cute "EV" button that does exactly what you describe, prevent the ICE from coming on. Obviously power remains limited then.

    The Karma 'sport mode' is designed to do the exact opposite, keep the ICE running so that maximum power is available at all times.
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  10. Sure, but that is NOT "full EV" mode, is it?

    Prius plugin is the ONLY Plugin car that I know that will turn on the ICE to "burn off" the excessive regen power.

    Calling that thing an EV is really a disgrace...
    -1
    Bad stuff?

  11. Well, too his defense, the Karma hasn't been produced for over a year and is, in my opinion, a poor excuse for an "EV". I wouldn't want that PHEV.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  12. And Eric, with due respect, that horse was flogged to death long ago on these pages in the comments sections of dozens of stories, and doesn't need flogging again.
     
    Post Reply
    +4
    Bad stuff?

     
  13. Then why do you persist is using the wrong term? You have an ethical responsibility, as a journalist, to not mislead... oh, wait, journalism no longer has ethics... My bad.
     
    Post Reply
    -4
    Bad stuff?

     
  14. @Eric,

    Why do you insist on spreading the wrong information when yourself doesn't know all the details?
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

  15. Wow. Guess that comment about being adults was intended for others to follow. Lmfao! People don't agree with you so you are going to have a fit and start denigrating them.Why don't you write something all in caps and then maybe they will change their minds. Pathetic!
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  16. Eric, while you are officially correct, the volt is a hybrid. it is the most ev of it's type available so far. compared to the plug in prius, or ford cmax...it's a much more true ev. as much as the tesla or leaf? no. However, here in the wide open usa it is a much needed stop gap for that little area between the east coast and the west coast to gain ev acceptance. people should celebrate that it can go months of daily driving, using mere drops of gasoline, instead of constantly deriding it's status as ev or hybrid. I would not be interested in owning an a 30,000 dollar car that I couldn't pick up and take on a weekend road trip, something I can do with the volt, not the leaf or bmw i3, or even the tesla...where I live.
     
    Post Reply
    +3
    Bad stuff?

     
  17. I don't agree - calling a hybrid an EV is disingenuous. Is there something wrong with it being a hybrid? I honestly do not think so, but as long as people think an EV runs on gas, the less longer it will take to deploy an infrastructure of DC fast chargers, etc.

    Getting the mileage the Volt gets and unlimited range is great. I wish ALL cars with gasoline engines were like the Volt. I do.

    However, if I am to applaud ANYONE, it is Tesla. In ~5 years they will have a $35,000 EV with excellent range and the Supercharger network will be nationwide, so range-anxiety will be a non-issue. After they do that, they need to do EVERYTHING they can to increase volume and become a real threat to the other makes, which will drive them to compete.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  18. @Eric,

    I think your attitude is disingenous b/c you are blending a superior configuration as hybrid which is something used to call Prius. When in fact, Prius is really just an ICE.

    I don't have much faith in Telsa's price range predication after the latest price increase....

    Until then, Volt is the only car that gives you more than 200 miles range for under $35k MSRP.
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

  19. Yes the Volt is a hybrid. But the problem with calling it a hybrid is that to the uninformed it means it operates the same as regular hybrid like the Prius. The volt system is drastically different than cars like the Prius, or CRZ, or Ford's hybrids. That is why i think the EREV designation makes the most sense.
     
    Post Reply
    +3
    Bad stuff?

  20. Eric; why do i get the feeling you are a linguist who is upset that "slang" is added to the official English language daily?

    Whether your definition is right or wrong does NOT MATTER. its only what the public is willing to accept. You may own the island you reside on, but dont expect any visitors
     
    Post Reply
    -1
    Bad stuff?

  21. I drive a Leaf. I would seriously consider a range extender, since it would make the Leaf essentially like a 80 mile range Volt.

    What would really be ideal would be a range extender you could add-on for specific trips, so you didn't have to carry it around all the time. I know that's a lot to ask, but an "a la carte" range extender would let me drive 95% of trips electrically, as I do now, and the remaining 5% with convenience.
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

     
  22. I saw somewhere (forgot where) a couple days ago, that some company in France is offering (or planning to offer anyhow) a range extending generator for EVs on a trailer. Most of the comments made fun of it and said things like EVs don't have tow hitches or that it makes no sense to pull a generator around all the time.

    It seems like you get the idea though. A generator WHEN YOU NEED IT and leave it at home when you don't.
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

     
  23. We put a tow hitch on our Leaf. We use it to put on a cargo tray so we can bring home bigger items from the hardware store or other small tasks.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  24. If the hitch rating is sufficient, it seems logical that a well designed generator could be towed for range extension. I personally would much prefer that than adding the weight of a range extender to an EV as a permanent addition.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  25. Those kind of REx are very inefficient...
    -1
    Bad stuff?

  26. Didn't we discuss all of these issues/solutions to death years ago. What on earth is the point. Whaa whaaa whaa, the entire world didn't reach the same conclusion that I did, Whaaa...
    -2
    Bad stuff?

  27. I believe it was www.eptender.com
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  28. Sounds like a great idea. However my disappointment with my Nissan Leaf here in Southern Arizona, would make me hesitant, due to the premature battery degradation issue.
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

     
  29. @ John Steele:
    What is with this battery degradation in Arizona? I have a Leaf and live in Texas where the temperature during the summer is 100 F for 30-50 days during the summer months. I have never heard of this problem in Texas.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  30. For all practical purposes, this range extender might work for Europe and maybe even Kansas, but I really, really, doubt that it can pass California-type emission requirements. It takes a whole lot of engineering and cash resources to pass these type of stringent emission programs.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  31. Sounds like devolution, like turning a person into an ape.
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

     
  32. Some people are already turning into apes...
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

     
  33. No - the end user is recognizing when his or her needs will change, and adapting to that situation. He or she won't haul the trailer around every day of the week.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  34. A vast majority of PEV owner/operators want more range (excluding those with a Tesla). Surveys indicate a range of 120-150 real-world miles satisfies most drivers desire for an everyday range. (i.e. removes many anxieties)

    Question is do drivers prefer a pure-battery based sustainability option, or are willing to compromise with an ICE based option? How often would a range-extender be required to complete a trip? Will owner/operators prefer a built-in, or add-on (trailer-mounted) option with a choice to purchase, or rent?
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  35. Ia manufacturer supported option was available for either a range extending generator on a trailer or one built into the car, I would go for the trailer, hands down. The option of it being on-board simply adds unnecessary weight and decreases efficiency when it is not needed. I also would be perfectly happy with the generator being an ICE, especially if it was a flex-fuel engine and can run on 100% ethanol, diesel, gasoline, etc.

    As to rent or own, I think it would depend largely on personal habits - I would rent as I take long trips quite infrequently, but I know people who take long trips seemingly monthly, so I bet they would want to own.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  36. Towing a trailer will affect braking, handling and extreme weather conditions...

    Also, the efficiency of those generators are much lower than the permanent type. Not to mention that for long trip that require full performance, the trailer size would have to be at least 80-90HP range which is a decent size and weight to tow around.
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

  37. I would not add a range extender to my Focus Electric. I chose the Focus specifically because it uses no gasoline at all, ever. I weighed the options like the Volt and the C-Max Energi but decided against them specifically because of their gasoline feature.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  38. I largely agree with this sentiment.

    Would you, if available, be interested in a range extending generator trailer that ran on gas for occasional longer trips?
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  39. It's hard to say at this point. It would have to be easy to use and clean from an emissions perspective.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  40. I can't imagine this being viable for several reasons. In no particular order here are the issues I see - potentially voids the car's warranty; you lose EV capacity to install it; by the time it makes it to mass market (i.e., existing vehicles where they could test prototypes), there will likely be other higher range EVs on the market that will supplant the need for this thing; which EVs you will add them too? (the Leaf would seem to be the only one that would make sense). If I keep at it I can probably think of a few more. No matter how I look at it, I just don't see this as being even remotely viable.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  41. Indeed you need to cooperate with car makers and maintain warranty. Testing of EP Tender this fall, and pilot experiments in 2014. Targets: Nissan Leaf, Renault Zoe and Kangoo, Chevrolet Spark, BMW i3, e-Smart, e-Up! e-Golf, e-Focus, Chinese domesctic Evs, etc (any EV running on 300-400V). I even think some Tesla model S users, and naturally the future C may see some interest for the occasional long trips (but not mid trips contrary to other EVs).
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  42. Ummm just "who" is monitoring the uncontrolled exhaust emissions of these aftermarket range extenders? Highly doubt they have a three-way catalyst or closed-loop emissions systems. FAIL IMHO
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  43. I think the type of person that has the skills to "retrofit a range extender to an electric car" would rather retrofit an ICE car with an EV drivetrain (aka BEV Conversion). Bonus: they get to pick how much battery and range fits their budget. :)
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  44. Dear all,

    Here is the web site of the EP Tender (the French company mentionned above which develops a REX mounted on a trailer): www.eptender.com

    35kW power is targeted (prototype 22 kW), with 9 1/4 gallons fuel tank (delivering circa 100 kWh on top of the vehicle's battery).

    It'll be retented on demand.

    Regarding emissions: it is based on an existing car engine, and makes the EV an occasional serial hybrid. New regulation needs to be build as the engine is not inside the car, but all else equal I expect it should be manageable, even for the upcoming Euro 6.

    Plse also have a look at the video demonstrating the backing mechanism, and the blog for range and mpg estimates (skip French parts).
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

     
  45. The EP Tender seems like a good concept. Rent the ICE range extender trailer only when needed, for long trips. Seems like a better solution than trying to shoehorn an ICE generator into an existing BEV, a complex and costly project. With an ICE generator conversion you give up cargo volume and add weight to a car that will still be an EV most of the time.
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  46. I own a 2012 Leaf, and several other cars. There is no way I would be interested in a range extender. Planning a drive somewhere may dictate that I either take the Leaf, or one of the other cars. If someone is down to one car (say a Leaf) he either bought the wrong vehicle and should have purchased a Volt, or should have thought about the consequences up front and resigned himself to the limitations of the vehice. That being said, I simply LOVE my Leaf and manage to drive it on local trips, racking up about 1000 miles / month.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  47. One thing to note is the fact that those type of REx are generally inefficient in terms of MPG.

    BMW's i3 with REx is a clear example. Fisker Karma is another.

    Those REx has limited role and seldomly supply enough power for long range driving.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  48. EPA ratings for the i3 aren't known yet, but all point to them being similar or higher than the Volt you consider is doing great in that category.

    This doesn't even take into account that such vehicle would travel more miles on just electricity in the first place, further lowering overall/average fuel consumption.

    Regarding power: the i3 REx alone provides 25 kW, enough for a continuous 75mph, or 45mph at a 6% incline; by simply turning it on early, one could vastly exceed those figures.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  49. "but all point to them being similar or higher than the Volt you consider is doing great in that category."

    Really? What points to it? The 2.4 gallon gas for 80 -90 miles range? At that range, it is worse than Volt's MPG. With REx, it even has worse Cd than Volt. I don't see any evidence that points to it.

    http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1085916_2014-bmw-i3-range-extender-heavier-less-electric-range-less-performance

    "This doesn't even take into account that such vehicle would travel more miles on just electricity in the first place, further lowering overall/average fuel consumption."

    We are NOT talking about MPGbs here, are we? We are talking about taking extended range trips.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  50. "by simply turning it on early"

    By your logic, there are no evidence pointing that is even possible.

    If BMW really wants to "cheat" the BEVx or ZEV rules, it is certain NOT gonna have that mode.

    "45mph at a 6% incline"

    Again, loaded with 4 people or just the driver. NO figures provide. It is just all talks.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  51. Re mileage: "What points to it?"

    BMW's own specs: http://insideevs.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/bmw-i3-and-REx-specs.png
    9 liters tank for 124~160 km extension = 33~42 mpg if exactly 100% of the tank is used; more otherwise, which is likely.

    "turning [the REx] on early"

    Again just info from BMW, stating the REx can be manually activated when [battery] below 80%:
    http://insideevs.com/inside-the-operation-of-the-bmw-i3-range-extender-option-pricing/

    "45mph at a 6% incline"

    It's called physics, not "talks"; does the concept elude you?
    Exec summary: it takes 17~18 kW to lift ~1.5 tons* up 1.2m/s; remaining 8 kW for air resistance etc at that speed.
    (* so one big or 2 light persons; figures don't change much for 4, still 40-something mph)
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  52. Another fact, with only 2.4 gallon of range 80 miles at most and significantly less than that for hill climb, how do you manage to climb the Sierra Nevada or Rocky mountain without frequent refilling?

    Even BMW is saying that i3 is a city car. The REx is there for range anxiety, NOT for long range driving. It provides you a rental for long trips...
     
    Post Reply
    -1
    Bad stuff?

  53. Another Fact, GCR's report shows that i3 with REx will have 10% less EV range.

    If it is 22KWh battery, then that is about 2.2KWh. How many miles of mountain climbing do you think that will sustain at 65mph?

    Sure, the last thing we need is an "EV" that drives the slow truck lane...
     
    Post Reply
    -1
    Bad stuff?

  54. Why would I want to turn the leaf into a PHEV? Very, very few people need the range of a leaf and the "range extender" option. Just rent a car or take another car that is probably in your driveway. If you regularly drive very long distances, this may make sense, but well see…
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  55. B/c some people have range anxiety. GCR stated a study in Japan that cars with REx or better infrastructure will allow EV drivers to go farther per charge and they will be more willing to risk taking a trip that near the limit of the range.

    BMW is offering REx for exactly that reason.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  56. I think all the crazy idea about towing it around is silly.

    The best way is to design a BEV with a slot in the front/back/rear of the car (like the i3 design) with a standard REx in mind that is powerful enough to keep the car for the long trips. When you do need one, you just pull in the "rental center" and have it put in within 15 mins. Then you can just drive on.

    It is better than renting a gas car. After all, it is the same car that you have and you don't have to deal with rental cars that are dirty, smelly or uncomfortable to you.
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

  57. "What would really be ideal would be a range extender you could add-on for specific trips, so you didn't have to carry it around all the time. "

    Is this the same logic as why bother with a BEV with large battery pack as Tesla since a Leaf is enough for many people, so why bother with the extra 1,000lbs 60KWh additional battery?

    I think that is a silly reasoning. Sure, it will help efficiency with less weight, but I think most people prefer more range over less weight if price is not an issue.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  58. Shows that Tesla has the only viable electric car in production. I routinely drive more than 75 miles in a day. I have family 65 to 70 miles away and my cabin is 57 miles away and I work just over 40 miles away from home and the only EV that can do that kind of range is the Tesla Model S. Slapping an ICE into an EV to extend its range is a bit of bandage compared to adding additional battery capacity. Soon I hope to see 150+ mile range EV's that will satisfy all but 1% of drivers daily needs. Hopefully Tesla's GEN III will be the first 200 mile range affordable EV in the $30,000 to $35,000 price point. By 2016 Detroit & Japan better offer bigger battery packs that offer more driving range than their current seemingly agreed upon 75 miles.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  59. Could not agree more. I hope every EV manufacturer is reading this oolumn. My Leaf range prohibits me from making an all-EV trip to Austin. Teslas are too expensive. I am hesitant to buy a plug in Hybrid with only 35 miles of all-electric range, since I have all this solar PV capacity to charge with. The world needs a solid, affordable 200+ mile EV, or at least a plug in hybrid that can do 75+ miles in all electric mode.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  60. One of the most interesting things to come out of the Tesla story so far is that so many of their customers were willing to pay an additional $10K to boost their range from 140 miles to 208 miles. Demand for the 140 was so low that Tesla cancelled the option. This speaks volumes about where electric cars need to go to be really successful, and so far only Tesla seems to be listening.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

  61. Exactly! Survey after survey, studies after studies, they all show that people want a 150 miles to 200 miles EV. That is real world range, not ideal best case. It is a range that no matter what, people can realistically get.

    And currently there is NOTHING in that range except for the Model S. But most buyers can't afford a $40k or above car.

    I said this many times already. Most Volt buyers would have easily bought a BEV with 200 miles range for the same price if there was one available.

    I would have supported the i3 with REx more if the REx has some real range and performance. But the i3 itself is still a good car with tons of cutting edge technology.
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

  62. NO GAS!! No pollution!! No nano-particles, what is wrong with you guys, sticking the stinking gas "range extenders" on clean cars
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  63. Well, it works for Israel and small area with battery swap. But it doesn't in large area such as US with limited infrastructure and existing battery technology.

    Oh, the REx is just a bridge technology to the future.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  64. Yuval, I agree that sticking a range extender on a clean car is not a good direction to go. I have a Leaf, and no way I'd do that. However, when I need to drive to Austin and back (round trip 150 miles) I can't take the Leaf. Right now I am forced to drive my gas or diesel car. I'd settle for a hybrid that could get 75 miles in all electric mode, because at least I could use some solar panel created kwh, or wind produced kwh from my local utility. The only way to be a purest is to live in a small driving radius. I want to be a purest, but the technology is just not there, yet. Until then, some of us will have to compromise.
     
    Post Reply
    +2
    Bad stuff?

  65. the point is to get away from gasoline, not dive deeper into it.

    currently there is not a single hybrid that excels.

    price factored in, ALL hybrids are crap, they are worse than their competitors in the price range and worse than competitors in form factor, they are all slower than ICE counterparts, they all are complicated and heavy, you still have to do regular ICE maintenance (gas and oil go stale after several months)

    whats the point? drop the hybrid crap and start developing pure EV's with longer range, lithium has a theoretical energy density close to gasoline (10kW/kg vs 13kW/kg), if you get within 30% of that you are out ranging similar ICE vehicles.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement

Find Green Cars

Go!
Advertisement

Advertisement

 
© 2014 Green Car Reports. All Rights Reserved. Green Car Reports is published by High Gear Media. Send us feedback. Stock photography by Homestar, LLC.