Advertisement

Portland Welcomes Electric Avenue, Showcases Charging Stations

 
Follow Nikki

Electric Avenue street sign, Venice, CA, by Flickr user brookewill

Electric Avenue street sign, Venice, CA, by Flickr user brookewill

Enlarge Photo

Which electric car charging station is the best? And just how are public charging stations getting used?

These are just two of the questions Portland State University and Portland General Electric Co. are hoping to answer with a two-year research project into electric car charging stations and their usage.  

Rather than concentrate on just one charging station, the research team will be collecting data from a whole block’s worth of charging stations made by a variety of charging station manufacturers.

As well as examining how the charging stations are used by local electric car owners, team will be able to study the different ways in which infrastructure providers tackle the problem of providing electric cars with charging power. 

Included in the study are charging stations made by Eaton, Shorepower Technologies, OpConnect, SPX, Ecotality, and General Electric.

While most charging stations will only offer a level 2 fast charge connectivity, Cleveland-based Eaton Corp. has installed a rapid DC charger as part of the project, enabling the research team to examine how rapid charging affects the way owners of compatible cars like the 2012 Nissan Leaf and 2012 Mitsubishi i use charging infrastructure. 

Portland CHAdeMO quick-charging station (publicly accessible)

Portland CHAdeMO quick-charging station (publicly accessible)

Enlarge Photo

While the charging stations will be free for any electric car owner to use, those making use of the free power will have to pay any relevant parking charges incurred while recharging. 

Apart from providing solid academic research possibilities, the Electric Avenue (located along a one-block area of Southwest Montgomery between Broadway and Sixth) further secures Portland’s place as one of the 25 most electric-vehicle-ready cities in the U.S.  as well as probably being one of the most electric car-friendly cities in the world.

Combined with neighboring Washington and its I-5 Electric Highway and we think you’ll agree: the Pacific Northwest loves  electric cars. 

[Portland State University, Portland General Electric]

+++++++++++

Follow GreenCarReports on Facebook and Twitter.

 



Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (6)
  1. Leading the way for those of us interested in all-electric cars, Portland, OR, and, to a lesser extent, Seattle WA. In the great Pacific Northwest.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  2. Great story Nikki. I agree the Pacific NW loves EVs. Let me know when you move here ;)
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  3. Are battery powered EVs close to being obsolete? Just to prove that anyone who rushes to implement an infrastructure for some new and fluid technology is taking a big risk and possibly wasting billions of dollars of taxpayer money is this article
    about a nuclear powered car, powered by Thorium and weighing in at 500 pounds for a 250KW power plant. A CT based company called
    Laser Power Systems claims to have a prototype vehicle ready within two years, and Jim Hedrick, until last year the U.S. Geological Survey’s senior advisor on rare earths – tells Ward’s the idea is “both plausible and sensible.”
    The implications are staggering - no need to buildout a charging infrastructure,etc. And far,far,far cleaner than
    using power plant juice
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  4. I don't know how to respond to this Kent. But generally, I'd prefer to drive a car which I can have safely recycled at the end of its life than one I have to place in a concrete bunker.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  5. Well said Nikki. The nuke car is 'just two years away' and fuel cells are just 10 years away. Kent, you can keep holding your breath, waiting for perfection, and using gas. I'll drive an EV.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  6. @Kent: LOLOLOLOL! You've given me my first real chuckle of the day, well done, despite your customary tone and cynicism.

    I didn't see a source link for your claim but do please provide one.

    Until then, the only nuclear-powered car I'm aware of would be the never-built Ford Nucleon concept of 1959: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Nucleon
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement

Find Green Cars

Go!
Advertisement

Advertisement

 
© 2014 Green Car Reports. All Rights Reserved. Green Car Reports is published by High Gear Media. Send us feedback. Stock photography by Homestar, LLC.