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Ford Transit Connect EV Specs Revealed


2010 Ford Transit Connect - media event in NYC, May 2009

2010 Ford Transit Connect - media event in NYC, May 2009

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The Ford Transit Connect EV will be one of the company's first electric drive vehicles.  It is expected to come to market near the end of the year.  Up until a few days ago, little was known about specific data of the Transit EV.  Now that has all changed.

With the Transit Connect EV scheduled for its North American debut at the Chicago Auto Show, Ford has finally presented full details about the vehicle.  This particular EV will offer an 80 mile range and hit a highway capable top speed of 75 miles per hour.  It can be recharged in about 6 to 8 hours with a 240 volt charger.

Additionally, the Transit Connect will later be offered in both CNG (compressed natural gas) and LPG (liquefied petroleum version.  Clearly Ford believes that this vehicle will be a forerunner in clean vehicle technology.

Here are the details you have been waiting for about the Transit Connect EV taken directly from the Ford Press release posted below.  Specifics can be found within the release at the end of the post, it's a lengthy read but full of information.

  •  Ford Transit Connect Electric, a pure electric-powered version of the award-winning Transit Connect small van, goes into production in late 2010
  • Ford is collaborating with Azure Dynamics Corporation to upfit the Transit Connect Electric with Azure's Force DriveTM battery electric powertrain and Johnson Controls-Saft's advanced lithium-ion battery technology
  • Transit Connect Electric is the first product in Ford's accelerated electrified vehicle plan, and will be followed by the Focus Electric in 2011, a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle in 2012 and next-generation hybrid technology in 2012
  • The all-electric, zero-emission Transit Connect Electric has targeted range of up to 80 miles per full charge, and will be rechargeable using either 240-volt or standard 120-volt outlets
  • Transit Connect Electric is ideal for fleet owners that have well-defined routes of predictable distances and a central location for daily recharging

 Source:  Ford Press Release

 

PRESS RELEASES

FORD TRANSIT CONNECT ELECTRIC COMMERCIAL VAN HELPS FLEET CUSTOMERS GO COMPLETELY GAS-FREE

* Ford Transit Connect Electric, a pure electric-powered version of the award-winning Transit Connect small van, goes into production in late 2010
* Ford is collaborating with Azure Dynamics Corporation to upfit the Transit Connect Electric with Azure's Force DriveTM battery electric powertrain and Johnson Controls-Saft's advanced lithium-ion battery technology
* Transit Connect Electric is the first product in Ford's accelerated electrified vehicle plan, and will be followed by the Focus Electric in 2011, a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle in 2012 and next-generation hybrid technology in 2012
* The all-electric, zero-emission Transit Connect Electric has targeted range of up to 80 miles per full charge, and will be rechargeable using either 240-volt or standard 120-volt outlets
* Transit Connect Electric is ideal for fleet owners that have well-defined routes of predictable distances and a central location for daily recharging

2011 FORD TRANSIT CONNECT ELECTRIC & TAXI MEDIA SITE

CHICAGO, Feb. 9, 2010 - Ford Motor Company today unveiled the all-electric version of the Ford Transit Connect - the 2010 North American Truck of the Year - at the Chicago Auto Show and confirmed the zero-emissions small van will be in fleet operators' hands later this year.

The 2011 Transit Connect Electric will use a Force Drive electric powertrain manufactured and integrated by specialty upfitter Azure Dynamics.

"Transit Connect Electric exemplifies how we are leveraging our relationships as well as our hybrid and advanced powertrain programs to bring energy-efficient technologies from the laboratory to the street," said Derrick Kuzak, Ford group vice president, Global Product Development. "Not only is this an ideal vehicle for eco-conscious fleet operators, it is an important part of Ford's future."

In addition to the Transit Connect Electric, Ford plans to bring three more electrified vehicles to market by 2012 - the Focus Electric in 2011, a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle in 2012 and a next-generation hybrid in 2012.

Getting charged up and moving
Transit Connect Electric is well-suited for commercial fleets that travel predictable, short-range routes with frequent stop-and-go driving in urban and suburban environments and a central location for daily recharging. The vehicle, which will accelerate at a similar rate as the gas-powered Transit Connect and will have a top speed of 75 mph, has a targeted range of up to 80 miles on a full charge.

Owners will have the option of recharging the Transit Connect Electric with either a standard 120V outlet or preferably a 240V charge station installed at the user's base of operations for optimal recharging in six to eight hours. A transportable cord that works with both types of outlets will be available for recharging at both kinds of locations.

The vehicle's charge port is located above the passenger-side rear wheel well. The onboard liquid-cooled 28-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack is charged by connecting the charge port to a power outlet. Inside the vehicle, an onboard charger converts the AC power from the electric grid to DC power to charge the battery pack.

"We're excited about the potential for our electrified vehicles," said Praveen Cherian, program manager for the Transit Connect Electric, who added that today's electric vehicle buyers are similar to early adopters of hybrid vehicles. "People were a little hesitant about hybrid technology at first, but now they accept it and embrace it. We expect the same will be true of electric vehicles."

Driving on electric power
When the vehicle is operating, battery power is provided to the drive motor through the electric powertrain's motor controller. The motor controller uses throttle input from the driver to convert DC power supplied by the battery into three precisely timed signals used to drive the motor.

The onboard DC/DC converter allows the vehicle's main battery pack to charge the onboard 12V battery, which powers the vehicle's various accessories, such as headlights, power steering and coolant pumps.


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Comments (2)
  1. Only "up to" 80 miles from a 28KWH battery...It's going to be really interesting to see if Nissan's real world range will be anywhere near the 100 miles they claim from their 24KWH battery. But the Transit and the Leaf are very different vehicles of course and maybe Nissan has better technology. At least Nissan features a 20 minutes/80% fast charge capability which sounds a lot more promising than Ford's 8 hour level 2 charging.
     
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  2. The Transit is a truck with much more frontal area, weight, and interior volume than the Leaf, but only 4kW more battery power, so of course the range of the truck would be less than the compact car. There is enough space behind the front seats in the Transit for a queen size bed, and a full five feet of headroom measured floor to ceiling. The Leaf also takes 8 hours to charge on 120v.
     
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