Faster Tesla Supercharging, VW diesel delay, Bolt EV dates, Autopilot do's and don'ts: The Week in Reverse

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2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV

2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV

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Who will actually be able to buy the first Chevy Bolt EV 200-mile electric cars late this year?

And, why won't VW diesel owners receive their official buyback offers until the fall?

This is our look back at the Week In Reverse—right here at Green Car Reports—for the week ending on Friday, July 29, 2016.

Friday, we passed along the news that GM has confirmed its 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV will starting arriving at dealers between October and December this year.

It remains to be seen how the world's first mass-priced 200-mile electric car will end up being allocated between actual retail buyers and Lyft drivers.

So far, GM has declined to clarify after a report that suggested that Lyft operators would get the bulk of Bolt EVs for as long as six months, following a few token retail deliveries.

Charging rates for Tesla Model S 90D at Supercharger sites, Nov 2015 vs May 2016 and Jul 2016

Charging rates for Tesla Model S 90D at Supercharger sites, Nov 2015 vs May 2016 and Jul 2016

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On Thursday, we reported that Tesla has boosted the charging rate at some of its Supercharger DC fast-charging sites.

Confirmed by a handful of media reports, we actually learned of it via a nice little chart supplied by a Tesla-owning reader.

Wednesday, we reported that a federal judge had given preliminary approval to the VW diesel settlement plan that specifies buybacks or modifications for its TDI diesel cars.

Owners will start to get official notification of their rights, but the buyback offers themselves won't go out until a hearing on the final plan now set for October 18.

In other VW diesel news, a recent survey showed TDI owners aren't happy with the offers they'll get or with the way VW has communicated (or not) with them.

2012 Volkswagen Passat TDI Six-Month Road Test

2012 Volkswagen Passat TDI Six-Month Road Test

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A few details on proposed modifications to VW diesel cars have trickled out, though any such modifications will have to be thoroughly tested and then validated by regulators.

Finally, lawsuits filed by three states claim that the highest VW Group executives knew about the emissions cheating.

On Tuesday, we wrote about a video on when to use Tesla's Autopilot driver-assist system—and when not to use it.

That system continues to stay in the headlines after a May 7 fatal Model S crash with Autopilot active.

Monday, we kicked off the week looking at U.S. sales of diesel passenger vehicles, which have plummeted radically in the wake of the Volkswagen diesel scandal.

We asked if any diesel sedans or wagons will be certified for sale for even the 2017 model year. Stay tuned on that one.

Photovoltaic solar power field at Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee

Photovoltaic solar power field at Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee

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Finally, we noted that more than half of Millennials—y'know, those durned kids—want solar panels on their homes within five years.

Somehow, we find that quite encouraging.

Those were our main stories this week; we'll see you again next week. Until then, this has been the Green Car Reports Week in Reverse update.

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