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Tesla To Expand Supercharger Network In Northwest, TX, FL, and Northeast

 
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Tesla Supercharger fast-charging system for electric cars

Tesla Supercharger fast-charging system for electric cars

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One of the features associated with the 2013 Tesla Model S all-electric luxury sport sedan is the dedicated Supercharger network of DC quick-charge locations.

Since the first stations went live last September, there have been only eight locations in California and the Northeast Corridor.

Now Tesla Motors [NSDQ:TSLA] is planning to open more locations.

in the company's latest blog post, George Blankenship, Tesla's vice president of worldwide sales and ownership experience, said that the network will grow--and soon.

"We will be adding Supercharger coverage in many areas over the next three to four months," he writes, "installing our first Superchargers in the Pacific Northwest, Texas, Illinois, and Florida with additional coverage in the Northeast and California.

"We’re also expanding existing locations like Harris Ranch, where we’re adding five more Superchargers in the next month."

Rumor would have it that one of the Pacific Northwest locations is planned for the town of Blaine, Washington, where there's a Canadian border crossing.

The Supercharger network is meant to allow Model S drivers to obtain rapid recharges--to 80 percent of battery capacity in half an hour or so--every 100 to 200 miles as needed for longer journeys than their cars' rated ranges.

The Tesla Model S with the largest 85-kWh battery has an EPA-rated range of 265 miles, and the model with the 60-kWh pack is rated at 208 miles.

Those ranges are likely more optimistic than owners will see if they travel at prevailing Interstate highway speeds of 70 to 80 mph, however.

For a first-hand account of using the Supercharger network, see our author David Noland's story from earlier this month: Life With 2013 Tesla Model S: Getting Supercharged In Winter.

Tesla Road Trip from MD to CT, Feb 2013 - Tesla Model S cars at Delaware SuperCharger location

Tesla Road Trip from MD to CT, Feb 2013 - Tesla Model S cars at Delaware SuperCharger location

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Comments (19)
  1. "One of the features associated with the 2013 Tesla Model S all-electric luxury sport sedan is the dedicated Supercharger network of DC quick-charge locations"; correct but it doesn't mention the most intriguing part: it's completely free!

    I think what Tesla is really trying to associate the Model S with is free long distance travel.

    Unless that's just a short term gimmick, "disruptive" doesn't begin to describe that concept.
     
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  2. it's not exactly, it's a service buried in the the monthly $60 tesla
    maintenance program.

    Now that includes other services, and heck for $60, propulsion, that's not a bad deal. Paying less then 1% of the car annually for service, support and quick charges is a good deal, but, you don't pay per charge,you pay for access.

    Now that said, I think paying for the charger service may create a business model for other places to put in superchargers.

    I hope it all works out and the superchargers grow and allow Level 3 chargers. It would be great if a supercharger route let you go from Miami to Maine and San Diego to Vancouver and Minneapolis to New Orleans as well as NYC to Chicago. That would be cool in it's own way.
     
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  3. What is this $60 monthly maintenance program of which you speak? There is a $600 annual maintenance program which can be reduced to $490 if you prepay for four years, but if the supercharger fees are hidden in it, the 40kWhr Tesla owners and anyone who didn't buy the supercharger option is getting shafted. It's more reasonable to assume the cost is included in the purchase price of the car. I do agree with you that it's a good deal, no matter how it's funded, and I think your cool fantasy routes will soon be reality.
     
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  4. The Supercharger stations will include solar panels,which, overall, are planned to produce more electricity then is consumed by charging, so they will help to keep the actual cost low. It is like being a distributed power supplier feeding into the grid.
     
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  5. BTW, a full supercharge saves about $40 from going out of your wallet into oil consumption.
     
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  6. And it saves you ten bucks in electricity costs too :)
     
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  7. "The Supercharger network is meant to allow Model S drivers to obtain rapid recharges--to 80 percent of battery capacity in half an hour or so--every 100 to 200 miles as needed for longer journeys than their cars' rated ranges."
    So I take this to mean I'm going to have to stop for 30 minutes every 2 hours or so for my entire trip to recharge. That's not a trip I'd enjoy taking.
     
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  8. Is driving for 4 hours and than stop and throw $60 worth of gas in your tank really that much more enjoyable?
     
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  9. 4 hours in my Nissan Altima would result in charges of around $35-$40. And I wouldn't have had to stop for 30 minutes once, or maybe even twice.
     
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  10. Let's say I'm driving from North Carolina to Orlando, Florida. That's a 12 hour drive including fuel and food stops in a gasoline powered car. Yes, I would rather spend the money and get where I'm going than to "waste" half a day sitting around waiting for my car to charge every two hours.
     
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  11. I understand your point. But typically, I need to stop for bathroom every 2 hours and some food and drink every 4 hours.

    Those typical stops takes about 10-15 mins each and longer if I have fillup and get food.

    But I agree that in a trip of 600 miles, I would have to stop at least twice in a Tesla S for at least 1.5 hours more than the similar ICE cars to complete the same trip. But you do save $45 in gas which should pay for the lunch and drinks. :)
     
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  12. save $45? what kind of "snugbug" are you driving? oh i guess i should ask you what you are paying for gas first.

    but let me go first. in my Yaris, it would cost me about $65.

    oh then again, to drive home your point, you could go with the best fuel economy available. Prius is it?
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  13. Well, in a 600 miles trip, I assume that you get 250 miles out of your full charge paid at home. So, I ignore that portion of electricity cost.

    So, the "free" supercharger comes at 250th miles and rest of the trip. That will require two fillup of 175 miles each. 350 miles @ 35mpg is 10 gallon. 350 miles @ 30 mpg is 11.7 gallon. @ $4/gallon, that is about $45 for the two "Free" fillups from Tesla Supercharger.

    But if you count the entire trip, then it is a little bit more. 600 miles @ 30mpg is only 20 gallon. $4/gallon will cost about $80 total. But your 85KWh charge @ $0.15/KWh would cost about $13. So, your total saving over the entire trip is about $67.
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  14. @ Xiaolong Li: to get a fair comparison Model S should be compared to its direct ICE competitors in terms of size and performance. Jaguar XF for example only get 21 MPG highway which would set you back over $110 in gasoline over a distance of 600 miles. Audi A7 costs less at 28MPG highway.

    Bottomline: roadtrips are slower in a model S (or more relaxed, depending on your attitude). One would like to drive for 2 hours and rest for 15 minutes, in Model S you will have to pause for at least 30 minutes for the next 150 miles leg. It's great that Tesla makes up for that "inconvenience" by offering the energy for free.
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  15. There are more comments in this thread
  16. Tesla has the right idea with the supercharger network. It would essentially remove the biggest stumbling block about taking an EV cross country that is long recharge times. I do not feel that it is too much of an inconvenience to stop for 1/2 hour after 3 hours of driving to recharge. the average gas station stop takes 10 to 15 minutes anyway so this would make the Tesla Model S into an effective interstate cruising machine. I could see recharging stations being put up every 200 or so miles on the freeways and free*(part of $60/month fee) would be cheap in comparison to gasoline.
     
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