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Electric Car Price Guide: Every 2014-2015 Plug-In Car, With Specs

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2013 Chevrolet Volt

2013 Chevrolet Volt

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It's a hot topic whenever anyone mentions electric cars: pricing.

Many electric cars are more expensive than their regular counterparts, though naturally they cost less to run too.

But what do today's electric and plug-in cars actually cost? We've gathered together each plug-in car on sale today in one place. Every vehicle here shows the manufacturer's suggested retail price, plus any mandatory destination and handling fees.

The prices do not include any local or federal tax incentives or rebates--so many cars here may be available cheaper, for those eligible for specific credits or rebates.

MPGe figures listed below refer to the cars' electric efficiency, unless otherwise stated.

2014 Mitsubishi i-MiEV - $23,845
16 kWh battery, 62 miles (EPA), 112 MPGe, 49 kW motor

Mitsubishi's jellybean-style electric car has never been a strong seller in the U.S, but the Japanese automaker recently slashed its pricing, making it the cheapest electric vehicle on the market. You're still saddled with low performance and those unusual looks, but some owners could drive from a dealership having paid less than $16,000 for their i-MiEV, if they're able to maximize their use of incentives.

2014 smart fortwo electric drive - $25,750
17.6 kWh battery, 68 miles (EPA), 107 MPGe, 55 kW motor

Smart's Fortwo Electric Drive is one of the cheapest new electric cars on the market. You only get two seats, but you also get rid of the gasoline car's jerky transmission. There's enough power to make good progress now, and if you're able to benefit from incentives, the price starts to look quite tempting. Convertible models are an extra $3,000 but top-down electric driving is a wholly pleasant experience.

2014 Chevrolet Spark EV - $27,495
20 kWh battery, 82 miles (EPA), 119 MPGe, 110 kW motor

Chevrolet has put the same effort into its diminutive Spark as it did the Volt, and has managed to improve the aerodynamics and interior to match the Spark's electric aspirations. With huge torque on offer, performance is strong and the Spark EV is good fun to drive.

2014 Nissan Leaf - $29,830
24 kWh battery, 75 miles (EPA), 115 MPGe, 80 kW motor

The Leaf is one of the better-known electric cars. While sales haven't matched Nissan's expectations and there have been issues with battery degradation in hot weather, the Leaf is still one of the most usable electric cars on the market. 2013's price drop made the Leaf one of the more affordable electric cars on the market.

2014 Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid - $30,800
5.2 kWh battery, 11 miles (EPA blended), 6 miles (EPA all-EV), 95 MPGe, 60 kW motor (134-hp combined)

The Prius Plug-In is a little off the pace technologically these days, but its similarity to the regular, familiar hybrid means it's ideal for drivers trading up from a regular Prius. The short all-electric range is disappointing to some--but in terms of sales, it's actually one of the better-selling plug-ins around.

2014 Fiat 500e - $32,650
24 kWh battery, 87 miles (EPA), 116 MPGe,

Fiat's 500e electric car may be a mere "compliance car", but the engineers have done a great job--it's nippy, fun to drive and probably a better vehicle than the gasoline version. Limited availability is a hindrance, though, and the price is pretty steep for such a small car. Oh, and Fiat's boss would prefer you didn't buy one--it's costing him money...

2014 Ford C-MAX Energi - $33,745
7.6 kWh battery, 19 miles (EPA), 88 MPGe, 88 kW motor (195-hp combined)

Ford's first plug-in hybrid challenger mixes good performance with impressive efficiency in electric mode. Like the Toyota Prius V, it's a practical vehicle too, ready to handle everything family life can throw at it.

2014 Chevrolet Volt - $34,995
16.5 kWh battery, 38 miles (EPA), 98 MPGe, 111 kW motor

Chevy hasn't yet hit its yearly sales targets with the Volt, but it's still the best-selling plug-in on sale. Over 30,000 have now found homes in the U.S. and owners are very happy. They're also doing two-thirds of their driving on electric power--proving that the concept works. A recent price drop has made the Volt $5,000 cheaper than before.


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© 2014 Green Car Reports. All Rights Reserved. Green Car Reports is published by High Gear Media. Send us feedback. Stock photography by izmo, Inc.
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