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Three Different Electrified Ford Focus Models To Be Built At Single Michigan Plant

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Ford Focus at the Michigan Assembly Plant

Ford Focus at the Michigan Assembly Plant

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It’s well documented that Ford is planning an all-electric version of its new global Focus--heck, we’ve even test driven a very early prototype based on the previous generation car.

But what isn’t that well known is that there will be two other electrified versions of the new Focus: a gasoline-electric hybrid and a more advanced plug-in hybrid.

In a world first, Ford has now revealed that all three electrified versions will be built at the same Ford assembly plant located in Wayne, Michigan. Not only that but the regular gas-powered model will be built there as well.

The plant was formerly utilized for Ford’s SUV models but underwent a $550 million rejuvenation to accommodate the new Focus models, which includes both sedan and hatchback bodystyles.

While the regular gas-powered model is production now, the battery-powered electric Focus goes into production late next year followed by new hybrid and plug-in hybrid versions in late 2012.

In addition to the innovative production line, which measures no less than three miles in total, the Wayne assembly plant will also boast a new 500-kilowatt solar panel system to generate renewable energy to help power the plant and ten electric vehicle charging stations. These charging stations will be used to recharge electric trucks that transport parts between adjacent facilities.

[Ford]
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Comments (3)
  1. Has anyone taken in to consideration what the roads filled with electric cars would do to our Electrical Grid System across the US, when everyone gets home and plugs their cars in? The amount of power it would take to meet that demand would be beyond comprehension and highly improbable! The amount of pollution that would be generated to produce collective power to supply homes and vehicles will far surpass the amount that is being produced now. Companies would also use electric vehicles and they would be plugging them in at the end of the day also. Even if timers were to be used, the demand for electrical power would be like overloading circuits at your home. And in the case of the EGS: all of the grids sectors would crash!
    People are affected by the electrical radiation from the size of the system now: what about a system that would engulf their back yards? Would you want gigantic transmission towers and lines in your neighborhood and your children playing around them? Ok, let’s put them in someone else’s yard! The electric vehicle plan would also give the government and large corporations more control over the population!
    So to sum it all up: let’s put an electric car or vehicle, electric trucks, electric garden tractors, ………… and oh yes, electric cycles; the electric versions of Harleys in everyone’s yard or driveway
     
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  2. The theoretical transition to all-electric would take decades, giving more than enough time to adapt the grid. But we will never be pure-electric. We need a mix, preferably using alternatives that are more suitable to differing regions.
    Yes, all this will cost money, but look at the effect on our economy should all those billions upon trillions of petro dollars going overseas stay within our borders! I won't even try to quantify what we spend to secure access to foreign crude and the environmental impacts that come with it. The transition will be expensive but that expense will pay enormous domestic dividends.
     
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  3. The theoretical transition to all-electric would take decades, giving more than enough time to adapt the grid. But we will never be pure-electric. We need a mix, preferably using alternatives that are more suitable to differing regions.
    Yes, all this will cost money, but look at the effect on our economy should all those billions upon trillions of petro dollars going overseas stay within our borders! I won't even try to quantify what we spend to secure access to foreign crude and the environmental impacts that come with it. The transition will be expensive but that expense will pay enormous domestic dividends.
     
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