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2014 BMW 328d Diesel Gas Mileage, Prices Revealed [Update]

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Want an indication of just how quickly gas mileage is improving?

Consider the 2011 BMW 335d. BMW's last diesel 3-Series model achieved a respectable 36 mpg on the highway and an unimpressive 23 mpg city, for a combined 27 mpg figure.

The 2014 BMW 328d's gas mileage figures have just been revealed on the EPA's fueleconomy.gov website (via Autoblog), and it's as much as 10 mpg better over every metric--recording 32 mpg city and an excellent 45 mpg highway, for a combined 37 mpg rating.

That's better even than the current diesel economy champ, Volkswagen's 2013 Passat TDI. The Passat is rated at 35 mpg combined, reaching 43 highway and 31 city.

The 328d does so by giving away a liter of capacity and two cylinders to the old BMW diesel, and its 180-hp and 280 lb-ft ratings do lag the 335d's mighty 265 horsepower and 425 lb-ft torque numbers.

But the 328d is still no slouch--badged 320d in Europe, the same engine delivers a 0-62 mph time of just 7.4 seconds and 142 mph at the top end. Slower than the old car, but quick enough to deal with most daily duties without breaking a sweat.

328d buyers get a sole transmission choice, BMW's excellent eight-speed automatic, while xDrive all-wheel drive and an xDrive wagon option will also join the range later this year.

xDrive models are marginally less economical, with figures of 31 mpg city, 43 highway and 35 combined. The wagon could prove a very useful vehicle, combining identical economy figures to the xDrive sedan with a 17.5 cu-ft load space.

The 2014 BMW 328d sedan is expected to hit dealerships this fall, priced from $39,525 for the regular, rear-drive sedan. xDrive models are predictably a little extra, starting at $41,525, while the xDrive Sports Wagon is priced from $43,875.

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Comments (9)
  1. Not too shabby. VW are you just going to sit back and accept being second best in the MPG wars?
     
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  2. That's pretty darn impressive! With such savings in fuel despite the higher price of diesel, this may pencil out vs. a gasoline version.
     
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  3. I drive a 2012 Passat TDI. Combined city / highway has never been less than 37 mpg. On highway at 70 mph it is usually 46 -47 mpg. Passat TDI figures in real life are more than EPA figures by a lot. I wonder if the real world BMW figures will match the EPA numbers.
     
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  4. The new Passat TDi is an impressive machine. Congrats on your purchase. :)
     
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  5. Totally agree. Just yesterday, my wife took our 2013 Passat TDI to work and was getting 57MPG. I usually average 52MPG on the highway @ 65mph. EPA estimates are way, way off.
     
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  6. "328d buyers get a sole transmission choice, BMW's excellent eight-speed automatic,"

    Nope, forget it! No manual - no sale!
     
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  7. Nice MPG. The diesels are really cranking up the MPG war against the hybrid...
     
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  8. I ordered one of these, BMW in Regensburg will start building it here in about a week. I've been waiting for a fuel efficient US spec BMW diesel for years and I jumped at the opportunity to buy one when they were announced. I've done some research and the US spec model is the same as the European spec model (HP and Torque) with the exception of the MPG. The US model will get 45 MPG highway, the Euro version 60 MPG highway. Can anyone explain to me why there is such a large difference (15 MPG) in fuel economy between to same engine?

    Thank you,

    Jason
     
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  9. @Jason: The test cycles and "adjustment factors" are quite different between the U.S. and EU. They reflect local factors--U.S. drivers expect better acceleration and average higher speeds in everyday driving.

    Neither test is representative of the way users drive in 2013, but the U.S. one is more conservative. It's apples and oranges to compare the two.

    Also, if you're in the U.K. (not sure where you live), don't forget that Imperial gallons are larger than regular ones, so U.S. and U.K. "mpg" figures aren't using the same unit of measurement.
     
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