Advertisement

2014 Audi A8 TDI Pricing & EPA Fuel Economy

Follow Antony

2013 Audi A8 TDI

2013 Audi A8 TDI

Enlarge Photo

Audi's A8 L may be a big vehicle, but with one of Audi's famed TDI engines under the hood, you know it's unlikely to drink fuel like a big vehicle.

That TDI engine is a 3.0-liter V-6, developing 240 horsepower and a chunky 406 pounds-feet of torque.

Despite the performance on offer--60 mph will flash by in only 6.4 seconds--the A8 L TDI is still rated at 28 mpg combined by the EPA.

That's higher than any of its other diesel or hybrid rivals--the 2013 BMW ActiveHybrid 7 and 2013 Mercedes-Benz S350 BlueTec both do no more than 25 mpg combined.

The aluminum-bodied A8 L TDI also manages 24 mpg city (better than the equivalent Lexus or BMW hybrid), and 36 mpg highway.

As with many top-end Audi products, the A8 L TDI features Audi's quattro all-wheel drive system. Additional equipment includes an optional Premium Package, with 22-way adjustable seats, front seat ventilation with massage function, and full-LED headlights. Pricing starts from $82,500.

The A8 L TDI is the first of of four Audi diesel models launched at the Los Angeles Auto Show last year. Joining the existing Q7 TDI, the A8 L, A7, A6 and Q5 SUV all get the potent 3.0-liter diesel.

The A8 goes on sale early Spring, with the others expected to arrive this fall. Pricing for the other TDIs will be announced later in the year.

+++++++++++

Follow GreenCarReports on Facebook and Twitter.

Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (6)
  1. 36mpg hwy is impressive for that size and weight and acceleration.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  2. ...And it will only get better (lower) fuel consumption, as clean diesel engine technology is still being very actively worked on and optimized. This is the cutting edge of mechanical engineering, where the most development time is spent.

    This is why I always claim that gasoline engine technology is outdated and behind the times.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  3. Confirms why Diesel cars are 50 % of the market in Europe and Hybrids next to nothing.

    If the US could rethink emissions rules about diesel then you could kiss oil imports good bye in three years.
     
    Post Reply
    +1
    Bad stuff?

     
  4. I'm sure it has nothing to do with the fact that diesel is subsidized significantly in Europe, just as gasoline is in the U.S. I'm sure it also has nothing to do with the dominant hybrid technology being in the hands of the Japanese, either.

    Compared to EVs powered by all but the most coal-dominant states, which are dwindling quickly now, even clean diesel will never be able to match the lower emissions, not to mention it's far easier to fight emissions at one source, a power plant, rather than tens of millions of vehicles.

    Diesel is not the answer for the American market and that will never change. Yes, plenty of great turbodiesels in Europe, true, but for emissions, diesels are and always will be a losing proposition.
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

     
  5. "I'm sure it has nothing to do with the fact that diesel is subsidized significantly in Europe,"

    Diesel is not subsidized in Europe; rather, *some* European countries tax it at a lower rate. Other countries, like for example Norway or Switzerland, tax the living daylights out of it, where it is the most expensive fuel (and diesels still increase year-over-year in numbers sold).

    "just as gasoline is in the U.S. I'm sure it also has nothing to do with the dominant hybrid technology being in the hands of the Japanese, either."

    Japanese are doing very well in Western Europe, where they mostly compete in the luxury car segment but can be up to 20% cheaper than BMW or Mercedes. And this they do in spite of the customs hike on non-EU cars.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  6. "Diesel is not the answer for the American market and that will never change. Yes, plenty of great turbodiesels in Europe, true, but for emissions, diesels are and always will be a losing proposition."

    In case you have not noticed by the number of SUV's, pickup trucks and large cars in this country, most people could not care less about emissions.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement
New Car Price Quotes
Update ZIP
We are committed to your privacy. By submitting this form you agree the phone number you provided may be used to contact you (including autodialed or pre-recorded calls). Consent is not a condition of purchase.

Find Green Cars

Go!
Advertisement

Advertisement

 
© 2014 Green Car Reports. All Rights Reserved. Green Car Reports is published by High Gear Media. Send us feedback. Stock photography by izmo, Inc.