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2013 Porsche Diesel And Hybrid Pricing Announced

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2013 Porsche Cayenne Diesel

2013 Porsche Cayenne Diesel

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If you're in the market for a luxury or sports car, regular diesels and hybrids like the Volkswagen Jetta or Toyota Prius are unlikely to be on your list.

Porsches might, however--and those still wanting to save a few dimes on gas or pump out just a little less emissions into the atmosphere may be interested in the Cayenne Diesel and Hybrid SUVs, or the Panamera Hybrid luxury sedan.

2013 pricing has been announced for each model, and it's the 2013 Porsche Cayenne Diesel that'll get you better gas mileage for the least money.

Starting at $55,750 plus $950 destination charge, the Cayenne Diesel's 3.0-liter, six-cylinder engine will get you 23 miles to every gallon of diesel. That stretches to a respectable 29 mpg at highway speeds.

Better still is the Panamera S Hybrid, though you pay for the privilege. The luxury sedan manages 25 mpg combined and 30 on the highway, with prices starting at $96,150, plus $975 destination.

In the middle, the Cayenne S Hybrid starts from $69,850 plus $950 destination fee, and official EPA combined economy reaches 21 mpg. You'll likely be buying this one for the badge alone, since there are certainly more efficient hybrid SUVs out there--the 2013 Lexus RX 450h gets a 29 mpg combined rating, in all-wheel drive trim. The plug-in Cayenne can't come soon enough...

Porche's hybrid line-up doesn't stop at SUVs and luxury sedans, however.

Also present on the price list is the 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder. The plug-in hybrid supercar will be the world's most expensive hybrid when it goes on sale, with an eye-watering price tag of $845,000.

Hugely powerful and hugely fast, the 918 is rumored to deliver economy of up to 78 mpg--though admittedly it isn't the most accessible of green vehicles...

Still, for those with even more green to spend, there's always the Weissach Package--less weight and even more performance. You'd better sit down for the price--$929,000.

After that, $56,000 of Cayenne sounds quite reasonable...

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Comments (8)
  1. More greenwashing for vehicles that are not even close to being green. Also, as usual, the 78 mpg claim should be read as 78mpgBS because it is not going to let you travel 78 mile based on the energy in a gallon of gasoline.
     
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  2. Love the Panamera, but would never buy one unless it came with a manual transmission, which it does not.
     
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  3. Panamera is possibly the worlds ugliest vehicle (except when viewed directly from the front).

    Hopefully Porsche will fix that in the next redesign.
     
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  4. We will just have to agree to disagree on that one: I find most of the cars for American market to be horribly ugly, and prefer contemporary, futuristic European design to the bland "econoboxes" we are stuck with here. We are stuck with what I term "designer vomit", vehicles designed by committees rather than artists.
     
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  5. "More greenwashing for vehicles that are not even close to being green."

    Oh, and electric vehicle batteries, and the electricity produced mostly from coal and nuclear power is "green"?

    Sorry, but what you wrote is pure propaganda.
     
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  6. "electricity produced mostly from coal and nuclear power "

    That depends on where you live. You can always offset the electricity source with "green" power, but you can't do that with your gas and diesel. Not to mention efficiency of electric powertrain which is 2x to 3x more efficient.

    Also, the gas/diesel that you are using also require electricity to refine and distribute.
     
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  7. "That depends on where you live. You can always offset the electricity source with "green" power, but you can't do that with your gas and diesel."

    That is technically incorrect: I could, given enough time, design and build a sterling engine powered by the Sun, which would generate electricity.

    I could then use the stored electricity to produce biodiesel out of organic waste and food scraps, even cooking oil. People throw so much food and used cooking oil away and pollute the environment, it is a terrible, terrible waste and harm to the environment. This way, the waste could be put to use.
     
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  8. This are large, heavy, performance-driven machines that cannot be made "green" by simply sticking an alternative powertrain in them.

    As for EVs, most are more reasonably sized vehicles capable of being powered by the sun using solar panels (such as I happen to have on the roof of my home.)
     
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