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Our Guide To Every 2013 And 2014 Diesel Car On Sale In The U.S.

 
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2013 Audi TDI range

2013 Audi TDI range

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It was much easier to be suspicious of older diesels with their poor performance, noise and so-so economy figures, and images of diesel-powered trucks "rolling coal" did nothing for their green image either.

The latest generation of diesels are significantly cleaner than their older brethren, with particulate filters and urea injection reducing harmful emissions. And, the economy and performance of modern diesels often beats their gasoline equivalents, while strong torque and low noise make them more relaxing to drive too.

As gas prices increase, diesel sales are steadily rising as more and more consumers make the switch to reduce their fuel bills.

Below is the GreenCarReports guide to every 2013 and 2014 model year car on sale in the U.S. We've updated the article to take account of some of the latest models.

Audi

The Volkswagen Group's ubiquitous 2.0-liter, four-cylinder turbodiesel powers the outgoing Audi A3 TDI, replaced soon by the new A3 TDI in sedan form. With a six-speed S-Tronic double clutch transmission the current car gets 42mpg highway and 30mpg city ratings.

Several models have joined, or are set to join the 2013 Audi Q7 TDI (28 mpg highway) this year too. That means diesel versions of the A6 and A7 sedans, the Q5 SUV, and the 24 city, 36 highway, 28 combined 2014 Audi A8 L TDI.

BMW

It's great news for BMW diesel fans--after a few months of "will it? won't it?", BMW has confirmed it'll sell a diesel 3-Series in the U.S, badged 328d. The car was officially unveiled at the 2013 New York Auto Show, and there's even better news--a wagon version will also be available.

BMW does still sell the 2013 BMW X5 xDrive35d, which uses a 3.0-liter, twin turbocharged inline six-cylinder diesel. It produces 265 horsepower and uses a six-speed steptronic auto transmission for strong performance... but that power does come at the cost of ultimate economy, with a combined figure of 22 mpg.

2014 Chevrolet Cruze Clean Turbo Diesel, 2013 Chicago Auto Show [photo: Brian Kersey for Chevrolet]

2014 Chevrolet Cruze Clean Turbo Diesel, 2013 Chicago Auto Show [photo: Brian Kersey for Chevrolet]

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Chevrolet

One of 2013's most eagerly-anticipated diesels is from Chevrolet, in the form of the 2014 Cruze Diesel. The 2.0-liter diesel punches out 148 horsepower, and drivers will stir a six-speed manual gearbox to reach 60 mph in 8.6 seconds--quicker than a Jetta diesel. Official EPA numbers still haven't landed, but Chevy is estimating 42 mpg on the highway.

We do know it uses urea injection to clean up emissions, its 4.5-gallon tank lasting around 10,000 miles. And we know the Cruze Diesel's price--$25,695, including a mandatory $810 destination charge.

Jeep

U.S. automakers are really getting on the diesel bandwagon. First there was the Chevrolet Cruze Diesel, as above, and then came news of the 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel.

The 3.0-liter V-6 turbodiesel puts out 240 horsepower and 420 pounds-feet of torque, more than up to the challenge of towing or off-road use. Official fuel economy hasn't been announced, but Jeep predicts 21 mpg city and 28 highway for the two-wheel drive model, and 20 city, 28 highway for the four-wheel drive. More could be possible in the real world--diesels often overachieve compared to their EPA numbers.

Further good news? If demand is there for the Grand Cherokee, even the Wrangler could get a diesel engine.




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Comments (19)
  1. Guess the oil and gas industry is still peddling their ware. Consumers want CLEAN power sources, not dirty ones. Please stick to electric/solar/wind combinations. I, for one, am not the least bit interested in Diesel, Gas, or Hydrogen.
     
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  2. Awesome.
    John C. Briggs
     
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  3. But then there is bio-diesel which could be a transition fuel. A fuel that can be applied immediately that is carbon-neutral, now the question is why the car makers are producing cars that cannot easily use bio-diesel.
     
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  4. Bio is not stable yet, when the production is stabilized to prevent corrosion, and the production procedure is standardized, only then will it be safe to start using this clean renewable fuel.
     
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  5. ...or you can walk or ride a horse.
     
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  6. There are more comments in this thread
  7. The article mentioned a diesel from a homegrown manufacturer, what was the planned contribution from Ford? GM are traitors received my money through deceitful means through our government, they will never receive any money from my hand.
     
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  8. Riding a bicycle the other day, I pulled up at a stop light behind a VW TDI. I could tell it was a diesel right away, but only because it was a quiet morning.

    But, I assumed that when it pulled away at the light, I would get a lot more diesel noise. I was wrong, it pulled away silently. I have heard more pre-ignition noise from gas cars pulling away at the same light. Well done VW.
     
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  9. I just pulled the pin and ordered a Hyundai Santa Fe with 7 seats to replace my wife's hideous Jeep Patriot 2.4l petrol. The Santa Fe is a 2.2l Diesel and the engine is a peach. Amazing torque, not noisy either at speed or at idle and the fuel economy it seems to deliver (looking at fue.ly not manufacturer numbers) seems to be much better than the 15MPG (US) her Jeep gets. The dash on the test drive model was showing 24 MPG and I can be sure that thing has not had a happy life.

    Modern good diesels (that you mostly don't get in the US) are pretty damn good these days.

    I'm not so pleased I have to buy a diesel but the price is good (new model in 6 months and they're discounting already) and hell, my other car is electric.
     
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  10. What about the patriot MB 2.2L crd OM651? Should be able to compare in the UK. Don't you have better visibility out of the patriot?
     
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  11. Awesome, these cars are going to be priced at least 10,000 under most of your wanna be Eco-friendly hybrids/gas except without the help of any government grants. Also you will not have to take out a loan, or a second mortgage with a diesel when the battery in your hybrid has to be replaced costing at least $3000, and don't forget about the not so environmentally friendly battery that will have to be disposed of. Clean Diesels are the Answer!
     
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  12. "Clean Diesels are the Answer!"

    Yes they are, at least in the foreseeable future.
     
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  13. [Our Guide To Every 2012 And 2013 Diesel Car On Sale In The U.S.] Jul 11, 2012. Why does Antony Ingram think the MB blue-tech 350 series of the E,S,ML,G is a 3.5L when it's a 3.0L. Can't this article be changed?
     
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  14. I got my Passat TDI 6M two weeks ago. EPA rated 31/43. My actual record is 40/55. On mainly 35 mph speed limit on one lane county road with lots of traffic lights, I normally get 40 mpg. On highways, I get 50+ every day, no sweat. achieved 60 mpg once, 55+ mpg about half of the days.
    A Prius achieves these too, if the pavement is dry, the temperature is between 55 and 70, the wind is calm, the road is relatively flat, the speed is no more than 60, etc. A lot of requirements to meet, otherwise, you would get low 40s, even high 30s if faster than 70 mph, on highway.
    One more thing, When I drove the Prius I used to have, a lot of morons harassed me by suddenly cut into my lane with their big SUVs or pickups, not any more after getting Passat
     
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  15. I am a diesel car fan. First was a 1979 VW Rabbit. MPG was mostly in the low 30 MPG range Then a 1983 Datsun/Nissan Sentra diesel. It averaged 42+ MPG average from new to 50,000 miles! Mostly LA traffic too! Then a 1985 Mazda 626LX diesel which averaged in the low 30 MPG range. Also a few Peugeot diesels in the past too. Mediocure MPG as they had automatics.I now own 3 diesels in operating including two Mercedes diesels ('97 E300 & "83 300SD) & a 1979 Citroen Pallas 2500D. Any up to date info on the forthcomming Mazda6 diesel? Currently diesel is running from .60 to.75 cents a gallon more in Calif. Haven't done the math yet on where the break even point is between regular gas & diesel is since you get more MPG with diesel but it also costs.
     
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  16. maybe i am missing the point except for emissions - but 42 mpg in 2014 seems lame compared to 40 mpg for a 1990 honda wagavan that i used to own
     
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  17. @Steve Except your 1990 Honda could not be sold as a new car today. It wouldn't pass today's safety tests and would likely be deemed unsafe. It wouldn't pass today's emissions standards. And its acceleration wouldn't be acceptable to today's buyers, let alone its level of equipment.

    Cars of a quarter century ago could indeed get decent gas mileage, but they were much, MUCH lighter. The weight gain has largely been due to vastly better safety, more standard equipment, and improved performance.

    That's the context for assessing today's gas-mileage ratings.
     
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  18. @Steve the EPA also changed the way it estimated MPG in 2008 to be more in line with what the public generally got. Identical vehicles in 2007/8 got drastically different mpg numbers. Your 1990 Honda was originally rated by the epa for 31/34 and in 2008 terms would have been 27/31

    Compared to that Honda 42mpg is more than a 30% improvement.
     
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