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2012 Tesla Model S Photo

2012 Tesla Model S - Review

 

2010 Tesla Model S

2010 Tesla Model S

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The Model S opens a new chapter in automotive history. Tesla Motors is the Silicon Valley start-up that jump-started the electric car industry with its 2 seat superfast electric Roadster that began selling in 2008.

The Model S is a 4-door sedan that has beautiful austere styling with European influence. It is highly refined and highly sleek delivering an incredible CD of 0.26, on an aluminum chassis with a total curb weight of 4000 pounds.

Tesla points out that both the drivetrain and battery are floor-mounted. This creates two special opportunities. It allows the hood to function as a second trunk and the battery pack the capability of being quickly swapped out, should charging infrastructure go in that direction.

There are also three on-board charging options, 120V, 240V, and 440V with the latter allowing a charge within 45 minutes. Tesla states that this rapid charge feature could conceivably allow a driver to go across country if they could find rapid charging stations along the way, and charge up in as little time it takes to have a meal.

Three battery options will be available. The standard carries 160 miles of charge, and there are 230, and 300 mile versions.

The interior of the car is spacious too. It has seating for 7, and when the rear seats fold down, the car could carry both a 50 inch flat screen TV and a surfboard simultaneously. There is also a radical 17 inch pure LCD touchscreen instead of a console. This eliminates the use of buttons and since it is 3G enabled, allows the use of Google Maps, Internet radio and what is certain to be a myriad of other web-vehicle technologies. Drivers will be able to communicate with the car remotely via iPod too to check their state of charge.

The car is rear wheel drive and can do 0 to 60 in under 6 seconds with an electronically limited top speed of 130 mph. A sports edition will deliver performance well under 5 seconds, and the single gear transmission offers responsive handling. An all-wheel drive version is under development.

Pricing of the car is set at $57,400, which after government tax credit of $7500 brings the functional price down to $49,900.

Tesla is now taking orders online, and hopes to build 20,000 per year beginning in third quarter 2011. Production depends on $350 million in Department of Energy loans that the company expects to receive, which it requires to build the factory.

One can also order the car at Tesla's dealerships now in California and Chicago. Additional locations are expected in New York, Miami, Seattle, Washington DC, London, and Munich in 2009 and 2010.

2010 Tesla Model S

2010 Tesla Model S

Enlarge Photo
2010 Tesla Model S

2010 Tesla Model S

Enlarge Photo
2010 Tesla Model S

2010 Tesla Model S

Enlarge Photo
2010 Tesla Model S

2010 Tesla Model S

Enlarge Photo
2010 Tesla Model S

2010 Tesla Model S

Enlarge Photo
2010 Tesla Model S and Roadster

2010 Tesla Model S and Roadster

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Comments (8)
  1. "Mr"

    Very Cool.
    Such vehicle technology will have to go hand-in-hand with widely available station quick charge technology. Good to see a 440V 45 min charge option available on this model. That's a start.
     
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  2. "interior?"

    does this car have an interior?
    looks good outside but why hide the interior?
     
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  3. "49.000 Tesla"

    Do these people really believe that the middle class is going to rush to the dealership to buy a 49.000 dollar car, .After all the economy is so great that I think am going to buy two
     
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  4. "?"

    Seating for 7? Third row seating? So it is an SUV?Then it is a STEAL for $49k
    better check on that seating number.
     
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  5. "Charge time?"

    I gather that 45 min at 440V is for the base 160 mile pack. Does that put time for the 300 mile option at somewhere around 100 minutes?
     
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  6. "buy it"

    Joe:
    50K for a car that uses no gas, no oil, has fewer moving parts, etc. I consider myself Middle class and yes I would buy one of these vs something similar from Lexus or BMW.
    I can run 220V to my garage now, so a few hundred bucks to an electrician and I'll charge in my garage over night!
    I think this is a winner and can't wait until they "hit the show room floor"...
     
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  7. testla is the only company in the U.S. that is seriously building EV's using up to date tech.
    HHMMMMM...would I buy one. I'll do a little basic math, My SUV i bought for $38k gets around 14-15 mpg and spending $300+ a month in fuel. If i bought a Model S For $45K (not figuring in tax rebait)the fuel saving alone makes its a cheaper option.My Car payment would only be a $100 more for the S model but a $300 fuel savings thats a net $200 to pay for any increase in my eletric bill. so it seems to me that i will save money not to mention helping the enviroment and giving me piece of mind. I Don't have much faith in Big car manufactuerers ever rolling out anything close to the model S !!
     
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  8. There is cost to purchase, cost to own, and net cost. Cost to purchase is what everybody thinks about based on sticker price, taxes and rebates.
    All of us that are interested in buying the Tesla think very quickly about cost to run including fuel cost. Using the above calculations, it would take about 4 years to make up the cost of purchase with the savings in gasoline.
    But there is more to that calculation. On the one hand, the cost of electric "fuel" is (as best I have been able to do the calculations based on data available on the internet) runs about one sixth that of gasoline. That number, even if accurate, is bound to vary based on each local market. And there are other expected savings on ownership costs like eliminating the need for regular oil changes and tune-ups.
    But none of this goes to the real cost of owning a vehicle, the net cost, which is what I am waiting to find out about. Things like life of the car-- specifically the battery. How much will it cost to replace the battery when it does wear out? And, will there be deteriorating performance as the battery approaches the end of its natural life?
    And perhaps the most significant factor in the net cost is the resale value. This seems to be the most ignored factor in the cost of owning a vehicle, but is one of the most important factors in determining lifetime "net cost". Of course, until these cars hit the resale market, there is no way to determine this cost.
     
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