Advertisement

Volvo V40 Diesel: Quick Drive Of Europe-Only Audi A3 TDI Rival Page 2

Follow Antony

2014 Volvo V40 D2 diesel - UK first drive

2014 Volvo V40 D2 diesel - UK first drive

Enlarge Photo

On the road

The V40 has a grown-up feel familiar to Volvo drivers since the dawn of time, with low wind, road and engine noise. In fact, it's one of the quieter small diesels we've tested--ahead of the equivalent Volkswagen Group products, and quieter even than our previous favorite, the Honda Civic 1.6 diesel.

The steering is meaty and there's plenty of grip, befitting the sporty billing. Only the ride misses the mark--it's not as cossetting as you'd expect, approaching uncomfortably firm on some surfaces.

Volvo's myriad safety systems all work well and make you feel secure on the road. This car was equipped with collision warning and blind-spot detection systems--the former beeps at you if it thinks you've not seen a cyclist, pedestrian or parked car at lower speeds; the latter flashes an orange signal near the door mirror to alert you to cars hidden out of view.

At the pumps

So, to the V40 D2's raison d'etre. Does its 1.6-liter diesel engine perform where it matters?

Yes and no. Predictably, it falls far short of Europe's typically wayward combined economy figures. Europe says it will do 65.3 mpg in mixed driving, identical to that of the Civic we drove before.

But while the Civic achieved a remarkable 55 mpg in our hands, the Volvo was closer to 45 mpg. Part of that is down to the different routes on the two tests--the Civic was largely tested on the freeway, the Volvo in town and country driving. A two-way 45-mile freeway trip at 70 mph did reveal the Volvo was capable of nearer 51.5 mpg at these speeds, though that does still lag the Civic.

Even so, it's not a bad result for a supremely comfortable, good-looking and refined luxury compact. And the Civic was unusually good, recording higher mpg in similar driving to any other diesel we've tested in the UK--so there's no shame in the Volvo not reaching those numbers.

U.S. buyers might expect more performance, so we suspect the 2.0-liter diesels would be best suited. Now all we need is to convince Volvo to bring them over...

_______________________________________________________

Follow GreenCarReports on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Google+


Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (3)
  1. "We've been driving just such a model in the UK over the past week, and predictably, you're somewhat missing out."

    No, I am not: even if I were living in Europe again, I would NEVER buy an automatic transmission vehicle. You really like this Volvo: I cannot understand why; I just do not get how you could love an automatic. I will never get it.
     
    Post Reply
    -2
    Bad stuff?

     
  2. Annatar - please feel free to read the articles before you comment on them; that way you might have seen me referring to the manual transmission, and indeed seen the picture of the shifter itself in the image gallery...
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

  3. Also, the car looks OK so long as one does not look at it from behind. The deformed taillights following the curve of the car are horrible. That is something Volvo has been pushing for years, and mo matter how much they push it, it is still ugly. The previous version of the S60 wagon with the round taillights was much, much nicer.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement
Advertisement

Find Green Cars

Go!

Advertisement

 
© 2014 Green Car Reports. All Rights Reserved. Green Car Reports is published by High Gear Media. Send us feedback. Stock photography by izmo, Inc.