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2014 Chevrolet Spark EV Rated At 82 Miles Of Range, 119 MPGe

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2014 Chevrolet Spark EV

2014 Chevrolet Spark EV

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The 2014 Chevrolet Spark EV has been a long time coming, but it's almost here.

This morning, Chevy announced that its only battery-electric car will have a range of 82 miles and be rated at a combined 119 MPGe efficiency.

MPGe, or miles-per-gallon-equivalent, is a measure of the distance a car can travel electrically on the same amount of battery energy as contained in 1 gallon of gasoline.

The Spark EV's 82-mile range matches that of the 2013 Honda Fit EV, but isn't as high as that of the 2013 Fiat 500e (87 miles) or the 2013 Toyota RAV4 EV (103 miles).

But its 119 MPGe is the highest combined efficiency rating received by any electric car on the market, including the much smaller 2013 Smart Electric Drive.

The electric Spark has a 100-kilowatt (130-horsepower) electric motor, more powerful than the motors used in the other electric minicars on the market: the Smart Electric Drive and the Fiat 500e.

That motor is built in Maryland, at a factory outside Baltimore that GM has been very proud to show off.

We'll have some driving footage of the Spark EV circling the plant shortly.

We drove prototypes of the Spark EV last fall in California, and found the car to be smooth, peppy, and quiet--as are most of the electric conversions of gasoline cars produced by global automakers, including the 500e, Ford Focus Electric, Fit EV, and RAV4 EV.

The Spark EV will go on sale less than two months from now in California and Oregon. It will also be sold in Korea, where all Sparks are built.

While Chevy hasn't yet released final pricing for the Spark EV, Chevrolet product marketing director Chrisi Landy said that the post-incentive or "net" price will be under $25,000.

That means that the 2014 Chevrolet Spark EV will have a sticker price below $32,500.

How much below, we'll have to wait until late May to find out.

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Comments (11)
  1. That is a pretty impressive range for the relatively small battery. I guess the efficiency number proves it.

    I am NOT sure if the owners can get those numbers with such powerful motor. If I own one, I would be using those 400 ft-lbs of torque all the time. :)
     
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  2. You seem pretty knowledgeable Xiaolong, so I have a question for you. Do you (or anyone else) know why similar EVs have drastically different amounts of torque? The Spark's 400 ft-lbs seems unrealistic for a 130 horse motor. The LEAF has 107 horsepower, but only 207 ft-lbs of torque. The Fiat 500E has 111 horsepower, but only 134 ft-lbs of torque.
     
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  3. It is NOT hard to design a high torque electric motor. But to do a high torque AND high rpm (with those torque being constant) electric motor, then it will be a lot more diffcult.

    There are many factors that can impact the torque and power rating. Permanent magnet vs. AC induction, number of poles, the type of rare earth magnet used and amount of cooling/max current, the configuration of the magnet layout can all impact the torque rating.

    There are many electric motor that can produces large torque at low rpm but they usually end up have lower rpm for those max torque.

    Also, torque is "deceiving" without the RPM curve. If the torque curve is flat across RPM, then peak power is at the max rpm.
     
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  4. So, in summary, if "everything else" is the same, then it is sometimes a trade off to get a large torque but end up getting a lower max rpm for the same torque.

    Also, the higher torque motors will also require higher peak current and better cooling. Those also add complexity to the controllers and require the battery to put out higher peak current.
     
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  5. My guess is the 400 foot pound torque number on the Spark EV is measured at the Planetary Output Carrier, and not at the Rotor Gear shaft. Gears multiply torque> bcove.me/0tqgrn0t
     
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  6. Are you sure about that?

    Where did you get that information?
     
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  7. Wrong
     
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  8. "using those 400 ft-lbs of torque all the time."
    Sometimes I wonder if that is the difference... "all the time."

    Most of these motors can put out 3 to 6 times as much torque at "Peak" than they can continuously. So are the torque specs really consistent from one car manufacturer to the next?

    We are really talking about a thermal limit for max torque as much as anything.
     
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  9. How much current those controllers and battery can handle also limit how much torque those motors can put out...
     
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  10. Another super ugly electric car. Why not make them beautiful and desirable?
     
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  11. Does Chevy intend to eventually sell this car nationwide?
     
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