Advertisement

Our Guide To Every Hybrid Car On Sale In The U.S. Page 2

Follow Antony

2011 Porsche Cayenne Hybrid

2011 Porsche Cayenne Hybrid

Enlarge Photo
If you want a larger SUV, Toyota sells the 2013 Highlander Hybrid. It has AWD for those tricky road conditions, and figures of 28 mpg across the board. 2 mpg shy of this is the new 2013 Audi Q5 Hybrid, though 26 mpg combined is a little disappointing.

Porsche and Volkswagen get in on the hybrid SUV act too, with the 2013 Cayenne S Hybrid and 2013 Touareg Hybrid sharing the same 20 mpg city, 24 highway and 21 combined. That's not as impressive as the Lexus RX, but for some the lure of a Porsche badge will be very tempting.

Right at the top of the tree, but bottom of the hybrid SUV pile, GM fields the 2013 Cadillac Escalade Hybrid, Chevrolet Tahoe Hybrid and GMC Yukon 1500 Hybrid. With a 6-liter V-8 the emphasis here is as much on traditional SUV benefits like towing capacity as it is on economy, and all manage 20 mpg city, 23 highway and 21 mpg combined.

Luxury cars

Previously it was a Toyota product that topped the list here, the 2013 Lexus ES 300h. Think of it as a Camry Hybrid in swankier clothes, with an interior that nods towards the even more upmarket GS 450h. At 40 mpg city, 39 highway and 40 combined, it's one of the greenest luxury cars on sale.

However, it's been displaced by the Fusion-based Lincoln MKZ Hybrid, which gets 45 mpg combined--plus 45 mpg in city and highway driving, too.

Another new entrant to the market for 2013 is the Acura ILX Hybrid. Based on the Civic Hybrid, the sportier and more luxury-orientated ILX achieves combined mileage of 38 mpg and as much as 39 mpg in city driving.

For greater performance and still-impressive gas mileage, the 2013 Lexus GS 450h would be our next choice. It makes 34 mpg on the highway, with 29 in the city. It also looks great, has a fantastic interior and performs well--this could be a real "have your cake and eat it" car. We drove one in June, and came away impressed.

2013 Lexus GS 450h First Drive. [Photos: Antony Ingram]

2013 Lexus GS 450h First Drive. [Photos: Antony Ingram]

Enlarge Photo

The 2013 Infiniti M35h also lets you have plenty of cake, and gets 29 mpg combined. Infiniti is at pains to remind us all that it's also the fastest hybrid on sale, and will even see off the Porsche Panamera S Hybrid in a drag race. Since the Porsche gets only 25 mpg combined, the Infiniti also wins at the gas station. However, Porsche's recent launch of the Panamera S E-Hybrid should give consumers a significantly more efficient vehicle, with around 20 miles of electric range.

BMW is fielding a selection of luxury hybrids this year, including the 2013 ActiveHybrid 3 and ActiveHybrid 5. Both major on power over efficiency (the 3 gets only 28 mpg combined), so really they're aimed at improving the gas mileage of the range-topping vehicles, rather than going for outright economy honors. The same could be said of the 2013 BMW ActiveHybrid 7L, with its 25 mpg combined.

Another new entrant, the 2013 Mercedes-Benz E400 Hybrid, achieves a so-so 26 mpg. It's a pity we don't get Europe's E300 diesel hybrid...

Still, it's better than the biggest of luxury sedans. The 2013 Lexus LS 600h gets only 20 mpg combined, just pipped by the 2013 Mercedes-Benz S400 Hybrid at 21 combined.

Pickups

It's GM or nothing here, so the General should be commended for trying to improve mileage and emissions in a sector not known for its green vehicles.

Your choice is between the 2013 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Hybrid, or the 2013 GMC Sierra 1500 Hybrid. Both come in 2WD or AWD options, and the drivetrain doesn't seem to affect economy. All have EPA ratings of 20 mpg city, 23 mpg highway, and 21 mpg combined. Prices start at just under $40,000

_______________________________________________________

Follow GreenCarReports on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Google+

.


Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (11)
  1. I had a chance to demo the Chevy Volt for three weeks. I drove from LA to Colorado and up to Crested Butte. The Volt it a great car. I loved it!
     
    Post Reply
    +3
    Bad stuff?

  2. Great to have this list.

    One nit pick, and I know this has partly to do with creating a narrative, but the Prius is certainly, not a "small car" it is EPA rated "mid-size." And more to the point, the Prius V is definitely not a small car and may deserve a passing references in the SUV section as a possible alternative to a CUV.
     
    Post Reply
    0
    Bad stuff?

     
  3. Yeah, I was debating where to drop those two. The Prius is bigger inside than its exterior suggests, but I threw that one into the first category in terms of physical size rather than interior volume. The Prius V could really go in its own category, but I see your point about an alternative to CUVs.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  4. Thanks for the thoughtful consideration.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  5. wow -- useful post
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  6. Very nicely done, Antony. No complaints at all and this should be required reading for people considering a new hybrid. Not literally, mind you, but I think this would be very helpful for a potential new buyer/lessee.

    I hope to see you do a similarly good comparison of EVs/PHEVs in 2015 when I'll be in the market myself... And more comparisons between now and then, presumably.
     
    Post Reply
    -1
    Bad stuff?

  7. great, comprehensive overview !
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  8. Great list!

    It is a shame for GM to even call those eAssists "hybrids". But I guess it is still one approach to fuel saving.

    I am still amazed that no company has attempted a hybrid minivan yet...

    Also, isn't the GM hybrid pickups going away soon?
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  9. I agree, great article. My only concern is that a lot of people might be choosing the Fusion Hybrid over the Camry Hybrid based on their inflated numbers.

    I prefer to check the real world numbers on fuelly(dot)com. The 2013 Fusion still wins by a little bit - 41.1 mpg vs 39.9 mpg. But that isn't nearly the difference that Ford would want you to believe there is. I own a 2012 Camry Hybrid and I love it. I'm getting over 39 mpg year round. Here in Chicago, the winters can be pretty cold and that affects the mileage more than hot summers do.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  10. Why don't all manufacturers use turbo charged engines? A smaller engine with a turbo can pump out the same HP (i.e. amps) with less weight.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  11. Cost and complexity, for two reasons ...
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement

Find Green Cars

Go!
Advertisement

Advertisement

 
© 2014 Green Car Reports. All Rights Reserved. Green Car Reports is published by High Gear Media. Send us feedback. Stock photography by izmo, Inc.