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3-Cylinder 2014 Ford Focus EcoBoost To Deliver 50 MPG-Plus?

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2012 Ford Focus Titanium hatchback, New York, July 2011

2012 Ford Focus Titanium hatchback, New York, July 2011

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Smaller, more efficient engines will be all the rage for the next 15 years, as automakers work to meet gas-mileage standards reaching past real-world averages of 40 miles per gallon.

One of the most eagerly awaited is Ford's three-cylinder, 1.0-liter EcoBoost engine, first shown at the Frankfurt Motor Show last September. It will replace non-turbo versions of its 1.6-liter four globally.

That engine is coming to the U.S in the Fiesta and the Focus, but, according to Motor Trend, the Focus EcoBoost won't arrive before 2014.

Best of all, Ford said it is targeting 50 to 55 mpg for the 2014 Focus EcoBoost--though whether that was a highway or combined rating wasn't clear (we're betting highway).

The traditional "buff book" drove the European version of the Focus three, and said "the in-gear pickup is what impresses" and it is also "astonishingly quiet."

In European trim, the direct-injected and turbocharged 1.0-liter three-cylinder engine puts out 125 horsepower and 147 pound-feet of torque.

Ford's 1.0-liter EcoBoost engine. Image: Ford Motor Company

Ford's 1.0-liter EcoBoost engine. Image: Ford Motor Company

Enlarge Photo

But, according to the British magazine Autocar, Ford is developing high-performance versions of its three that put out as much as 177 hp.

They are rumored to replace the EcoBoost turbocharger with an electric supercharger, which reduces engine power loss by removing the need to spin the turbine compressor.

At the largest, heaviest end of the Ford product scale in the U.S.--its F-150 full-size pickup trucks--Ford has had remarkable success with its 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6, which replaces thirstier V-8 engines of the same power.

The company's wholesale adoption of EcoBoost technology to increase fuel economy across its range has been partially funded by $5.9 billion in low-interest loans from the U.S. Department of Energy, announced in June 2009.

Today, the only carmaker selling a three-cylinder engine in the U.S. is Smart, which fits a 70-hp, 1.0-liter engine sourced from Mitsubishi to its Smart ForTwo minicar.

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Comments (7)
  1. That fiesta and focus are excellent vehicles. It will be amazing to see it get better than Prius HWY MPG for a low price.
     
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  2. I would buy this car right now. And if Ford would sell the C-Max seven passenger vehicle, they could have 100% of my automobile purchase dollars.
     
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  3. Since Ford is including stop/start with the 1.6L EcoBoost option in the 2013 Fusion, why didn't they use it in the hybrids, as well, instead of going with a new 2.0L Atkinson? Why develop a new engine (discontinuing the 2.5L Atkinson in current Ford hybrids) when the 1.6L EcoBoost appears to be able to handle a significant number of stop/start cycles?
     
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  4. Because the Atkinson Cycle engine is far MORE efficient than the 1.6-liter EcoBoost, and tuned so it produces essentially zero torque at the low end of its rev range, where the electric motor produces max torque. And, just to be clear, the hybrid includes start-stop as part of its standard running cycle.
     
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  5. I was not aware of the differences between the two engines. Makes sense.

    I am aware of hybrid operation, owning the 2010 Mariner hybrid myself. I like it much better than stop/start tech, but I appreciate the fact that stop/start is much cheaper, and that stop/start features on ICE cars will make a significant difference in fuel consumption and emissions particularly in urban and suburban environs.
     
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  6. Hum... this is a strange paragraph "They are rumored to replace the EcoBoost turbocharger with an electric supercharger, which reduces engine power loss by removing the need to spin the turbine compressor." I always thought
    Turbochargers do not reduce engine power, they use waste.. the exhaust gas. Technically, I think a supercharger does take away from the engine... even an electric one. I'm not an automotive engineer... watching to see one chime in :-) .
     
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  7. WOW! we are now producing cars that get 50mpg?? since we did that back in 1990 with the Geo line not sure why this is a big deal??

    VW has been getting 50+mpg with a diesel for even longer....
     
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