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2012 Chevy Impala Gas Mileage Rated At 30 MPG Highway

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2012 Chevrolet Impala Leaked

2012 Chevrolet Impala Leaked

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With discussions of raising gas-mileage standards beyond the 34 mpg they'll reach in 2015, there's a lot of shrieking about how we'll all be driving subcompacts if the rules get any tougher.

Hogwash.

Consider the 2012 Chevrolet Impala, Chevy's rapidly aging full-sized four-door sedan. Equipped with an engine transplant and soldiering on for another few years in a body first launched for the 2006 model year, the 2012 Impala will be rated at 18 mpg city and a notable 30 mpg highway.

Think of it: A full-size American sedan that consumes no more gas on the highway than the compact cars of just a few years ago.

2012 Chevrolet Impala Leaked

2012 Chevrolet Impala Leaked

Enlarge Photo
And that's with a V-6 engine, too. Specifically, a 3.6-liter V-6 that puts out 302 horsepower, according to the folks at GMInsiderNews. It's mated to GM's modern six-speed automatic transmission for the first time.

Note that the new engine's power is just a single horsepower below the old Impala SS model, which required a V-8 to produce that power--and was rated just at 16 mpg city, 24 mpg highway.

The 2012 mileage figures are slightly better than the Impala's older V-6 options, but a number of 30 mpg or above definitely gets attention in such a large and powerful car.

Imagine what the Impala could do if fitted with, say, a turbocharged 2.5-liter four with the eAssist mild-hybrid system, in a lighter, more aerodynamic body.

For advances like that, though, we'll have to wait a few more years. The replacement for the current Impala was frozen during GM's bankruptcy crisis, and so we're not likely to see an all-new model until early 2013, as a 2014 model.

[GMInsideNews]

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Comments (9)
  1. One concern that I have is the difference between potential mpg, actual and worst case.

    I'll explain; I recently drove a gas MINI rated at 28/36. Driven in the most dull way I got up to 38mpg at 40mph but it fell to 33 in normal stop-start and less than 20 when driven hard - and that's only a light (ish) car.

    A larger car that can cruise at 30mpg on the highway is great but, in the hands of a rough driver, with 300bhp on tap there's only one place that power is coming from; it's not a super efficient engine, it's just by digesting a lot more fuel!

    I think that pursuing best case fuel-ecconomy isn't a strong enough regulation. We should consider maximum fuel consumption as a metric too.
     
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  2. Can anyone explain to me the joy of a "Full Size" car? I rented a Ford Crown Victoria over the weekend and I cannot see any benefit over my Prius. All the luggage fit Prius and the Crown Vic. All four of us fit in both.

    Also, I did not enjoy driving the Crown Vic at all. Just like driving a boat.
     
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  3. It really depends on your size. Sufficiently tall people simply cannot be comfortable in smaller vehicles.
     
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  4. That may be true. When I got into the Crown Vic, the seat was pushed all the way back, and I couldn't reach the pedals. Also, I am 6'1" so not exactly small.

    On the other hand, I have no problem sitting in the front of a Corolla or a Prius.

    On the third hand, the back seat head room is somewhat limited in a Corolla or a Prius.

    So perhaps the Crown Vic is good for moving around a group of four tall people.
     
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  5. What on earth possessed you to rent a Crown Vic? I sometimes rent them, with a driver, by the mile in NYC and they're sick making in minutes. :-)
     
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  6. do not believe the impala at 30 mpg/will not happen/I know how to drive to get mileage. This car will not get close. Gates chevy in martinsville In. drove it and when returned was getting only 18 mpg. Dont believe gm tax robbing bankruptcy ruse lies. The company is not credible.
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  7. @Harry: Not entirely sure what you're trying to convey, but the EPA ratings for the 2012 Chevrolet Impala are 18 mpg city, 30 mpg highway, for a combined rating of 22 mpg.

    The article clearly notes that the 30-mpg number is a highway rating. If your test drive was in stop-and-go traffic with lots of acceleration and braking, then the 18 mpg you achieved was right in line with the EPA city rating.

    If your test drive was a blend of city and highway driving, you should have achieved roughly 22 mpg, in line with the combined rating. Hope this helps.
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  8. The joy of a full size car. hmmmm I see 2 benefits here compared to a PRIUS. 1. Bad crash, Prius, you're dead. Crown Vic, bad crash, you walk away. 2nd benefit? You are sending money to JAPAN which will never return buying the PRIUS!
     
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  9. I'm 6'1" and I own a 2012 Impala. I can vouch that the highway mileage estimates of 30mpg are accurate with in-town in closer to 21mpg.
    It's no slouch when you put your foot down, but it'll never win awards for the slalom. All in all - the best car I've ever had and a real sleeper in terms of value. (I bought mine as an 11 month old ex-rental with 35,000 miles for $12,995)
     
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