Advertisement

2011 Smart Electric Drive On The Streets Of London: Driven

Follow Antony

What makes the perfect city car?

Compact dimensions are a good place to start, so you can sneak into small parking spaces on a crowded street and squeeze through gaps that would leave other traffic impatiently waiting.

Nippy acceleration is useful too, so you aren't left lagging at the lights. Throw in a tight turning circle, smooth ride, and low running costs, and you're just about there.

If you add an electric drivetrain to that list, then you've basically described Smart's 2011 Electric Drive city car. We've driven the diminutive EV before, but smart invited us to test it on the streets of the English capital city, and it'd have been rude to refuse.

Our last drive in the car was on a smooth test track, so bumpy, pot-holed surfaces and stop-start driving would present a different challenge.

To all intents and purposes, the Smart Electric Drive is identical to a regular ForTwo in all but the drivetrain. That means the same quirky styling, and the same funky, airy and comfortable interior, suitable for drivers of well over six feet tall. Cubby holes are abundant, and the "ignition" barrel is in the center console (just like old Saabs) near a stubby drive selector.

Once on the move, you quickly build opinions on the car. Throttle response is smooth and the car feels nippy, but not particularly quick.

The accelerator pedal has some dead travel right at the top (in common with regular smarts) that makes stepping off the line smoothly and quickly a little more difficult than you'd expect. The ride is certainly better than the regular ForTwo though, despite the electric models riding on stiffer Brabus suspension--you can thank the damping effect of heavy batteries for that.

Steering is responsive, and the brakes feel sharper than the regular ForTwo, even though (or perhaps because) there's no battery regeneration under braking. When London's average speed is said to be less than 10 mph, the smart's 62mph top speed doesn't seem too bad either.


Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (4)
  1. No regenerative braking??? What can they be thinking? Couple that with $599/mo and I'm outta the game, LOL.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  2. Can someone translate "nippy but not quick" into American English? I'm guessing we might say, "quick but not fast"?
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  3. In Canada, "nippy" means cold.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  4. Ben and Martin, sorry for the confusion! One of the quirks of the language this side of the pond. Nippy means both "sprightly" and "cold" over here, though for the purposes of the article you can assume it's the former. Feel free to transpose "nippy" and "quick" for "quick" and "fast" if it makes more sense, though I'd personally describe nippy as a step down from quick, but a step above "tardy". Gotta love the language...
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement
Advertisement

Find Green Cars

Go!

Advertisement

 
© 2014 Green Car Reports. All Rights Reserved. Green Car Reports is published by High Gear Media. Send us feedback. Stock photography by izmo, Inc.