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Electric Vehicle Incentives Guide: Country By Country Page 2

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Neighboring Belgium is offering an impressive $11,700 from the cost of EVs, and Denmark, Greece and the Czech Republic offer exemption from registration fees and road taxes.

Not so lucky are German buyers - Autoblog, via German news site Deutsche Welle, reported back in May that federal funding will instead be going to technological research programs, rather than buyers.

China

The emerging industrial superpower is getting in on the discount act too - offering up to $8,800 to local governments and taxi fleets to switch to EVs. China have a thriving small EV market, some of which, like the Coda, are being re-engineered and sold on U.S. soil.

Other Green Vehicles

Some of these incentives extend to hybrids and other low-emissions vehicles, with France offering $2,600 towards the cost of some hybrids and the UK exempting cars that produce under 100 grams per kilometer of CO2 from road tax.

But the biggest discounts are reserved for electric vehicles. And despite the impressive incentives offered for EVs, newly proposed U.S. legislation actually puts more money into natural gas vehicles than into EVs.

To those of you considering buying an EV, the discounts will no doubt prove very tempting. In combination with the potential savings on running costs and maintenance, government incentives for electric vehicles allow these cars to be significantly more price-competitive.

Price is one of the main hurdles to the success of the EV at the moment--and reducing it takes EVs from the realm of the early adopters into the wider market, where sales success awaits.

[Detroit News]


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Comments (3)
  1. In Denmark we have a 180% registration fee and a tax of 25% witch mean a micro car of 3,5meters lenght cost about $17.500 and a family car of about 4,3meters lenght costs about $44.000. Of the 44.000 about 23.500 is registration fee. A all electric car like Nissan Leaf or Mitsubishi iMiEV is untill 2012 fre of registration fee while Hybrid cars like Chevrolet Volt get not exemption from registration fees.
     
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  2. Let us put an end to this nonsense about generous federal incentives for electric cars. Although it would cost the government the same amount of money whether it gave a $7,500 rebate or tax incentive, Congress's choice is wrong. A sensible incentive encourages those who could not otherwise afford something to buy it. A tax credit encourages high tax payers to buy something. Since they are most likely to buy without the credit, it does little to stimulate sales.
    Presumably the auto companies which advertise the tax credit and the media which report on them know what is going on. Most people will pay close to $32,780 not $25,280 for a Nissan Leaf. Moreover for those paying around $32k, they are buying a car worth something like $26k in the market. A person in a high tax bracket can sell the incentive to somebody on E-Bay.
     
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  3. "Not so lucky are German buyers - Autoblog, via German news site Deutsche Welle, reported back in May that federal funding will instead be going to technological research programs, rather than buyers."

    Smart Germans, investing in research and development instead of consumerism.
     
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