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San Diego Region To Get 2500 Charging Stations


San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) has announced it will work with Electric Transportation Engineering Corp. (eTec) and others on the roll-out of 1,500 public and commercial and 1000 home base charging points across the county, starting in four to six months.

The group's goal is to prepare for sales of the compact 2011 Nissan Leaf electric car.

2011 Nissan Leaf prototype

2011 Nissan Leaf prototype

Enlarge Photo

2011 Nissan Leaf prototype

2011 Nissan Leaf prototype

Enlarge Photo

2011 Nissan Leaf prototype

2011 Nissan Leaf prototype

Enlarge Photo

Nissan LEAF Charging Port

Nissan LEAF Charging Port

Enlarge Photo

After receiving a U.S. Department of Energy grant of $99.8 million, eTec--along with SDG&E and other local stakeholders--is working with Nissan to make San Diego electric car-ready as quickly as possible. This requires installing charging points in key public and private locations throughout the region.

The Nissan Leaf comes with a built-in Level 1 (110-Volt) charging system, capable of plugging into any household power outlet, that lets the car be recharged from "empty" to "full" in a sedate 14 or 15 hours.

Because Level 1 charging time is off-putting to some potential buyers, the group is mapping out the installation of Level 2 charging points in homes, offices, and public locations.

These Level 2 charging points can halve the Leaf's recharging time to around 6 or 7 hours at a maximum power output of 3.3 kilowatts. The first 1,000 San Diego purchasers (or lessees) of the 2011 Nissan Leaf who qualify can have Level 2 charging stations installed in their homes.

There will also be up to 60 fast-charge points in key San Diego locations, capable of recharging the car from 20 percent empty to 80 percent full in less than 30 minutes, using a high power output of 96 kilowatts (480 Volts DC, 200 Amps).

Both Level 1 and Level 2 charging points will have the much-anticipated J1772 recharging connector, which has become the U.S. universal standard for plug-in vehicles. Fast-charge outlets will utilize a separate weatherproof connector capable of high-voltage and high-current recharging.

The new Level 2 charging systems are being manufactured for $500 to $700 each, whereas the DC Fast Charge units go for as much as $35,000. They are reserved for commercial installations. Hardware and installation costs will be covered as part of the eTec project, called The EV Project. (www.theevproject.com)

Of California's greenhouse gas emissions, 38 percent comes from the transportation sector alone. The push for a stronger electric vehicle infrastructure marks another step in California's goals--the most aggressive in the United States--of reducing its statewide greenhouse gas emissions.

San Diego is the largest of the  five regional projects to install charge points in the U.S. Other regions include Seattle, Portland, Phoenix/Tucson, and Chattanooga/Knoxville, Tennessee. Nissan hopes the new charging points can ease customers into electric-car ownership while eliminating "range anxiety."

Installations will begin in the third quarter of 2010, anticipating delivery of the very first 2011 Nissan Leaf electric cars to customers in mid-December.

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Comments (9)
  1. Recent press releases state that eTec will purchase these electric vehicle charging stations from China. This tells me a good portion of the $99.8 million in AARA funds they receive will find its way to China, again? Give the state of affairs of the employment rate in Southern California, I think this is an outrage.
     
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  2. ETec builds their chargers in Phoenix, I know this because I have been in their facility. They may purchase some chinese components, but I did not see any signs of that when I was there. I have been in the car business for many years and I do know what asian packaging looks like.
     
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  3. I don't understand the 30 minute fastcharge time mentioned in this article. Theoretically a level 3 480V/200amp charger could put out 96 KW per hour. If 480/200 only refers to input power I can imagine that some of the original input is lost during charging (heat) but the article mentions an output of 50KWH which is barely more than half of the original 96KWH. Am I to understand that fastcharging means a massive waist of energy?
     
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  4. Chris O is correct, it should read 96 kW output. My mistake, correcting now. That's good spotting by the way mate.
     
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  5. Gavin: thanks for clearing that up. I spotted it because the numbers are important. For me to know if electric propulsion is indeed the future I need to have an idea that the numbers add up. Still don't get the 30 minutes though. To recharge a 24KWH battery from 20% to 80% takes 14.4KWH. Shouldn't a charger that puts out 96KW per hour be able to do it in 96:14.4=6.6 hours=9minutes?
     
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  6. Chris O: It has to do with a 'ramped' charging rate. The rate of charge is not linear on a battery.
     
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  7. All good IMHO. Bring it on. To bad it's not in LA, but soon come.
     
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  8. Absolutely wonderful review. Extremely unbiased and gave each product an equal chance while coming up with a clear winner for shine/ gloss and for ease of use. Thank you very much.
     
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  9. NICE...but what about all of us apartment dwellers?? Hello...no garage...no way to charge.
     
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